The Journey to Become a Pediatrician

Question

I am doing a report on pediatricians for school, and I was just wondering if you could send me information on what sorts of requirements are needed, salaries, and other information like that. Thanks a lot!
Evan Freese – Triadelphia, West Virginia

Dr. Greene's Answer

It’s back to school time and questions have come pouring in from students around the world about what is required to become a pediatrician. In some ways I’m glad I didn’t know all that was involved when I embarked on this course. If I had seen beforehand how much work was involved, I might have been overwhelmed and would have missed out on a life’s work that is truly thrilling, rewarding, and worth every sleepless night.

Although the preparation for becoming a physician doesn’t officially begin until college, it unofficially begins much earlier. Every decision for excellence, from high school onwards, impacts your chances of getting into medical school. The college or university you attend will be considered when applying for medical school — the more prestigious the school the better. During college you can either complete a pre-med major or a major in almost anything else. My major was actually in history with a specialty in the history and the philosophy of science. Princeton did not facilitate double majors, but I had enough chemistry courses to have been a chemistry major as well. Whatever your major, you must take courses in the core premedical sciences. These include organic chemistry, physical chemistry, physics, biology, and probably calculus. Your grades in these core courses will be particularly important for medical school admission. They will also help prepare you for the MCATs (the standardized testing which plays a significant role in medical school admissions.) To have your medical school application seriously considered, outstanding grades and MCAT scores are important. Once your application is considered, one of the things that will be looked for is your exposure to the world of health and medicine during your undergraduate years. Particularly favorable are a track record of medical research and volunteering in a medical setting. For pediatrics it is especially useful if the volunteer work you have done is with children.

With four difficult years of undergraduate education completed, and an acceptance into medical school, you will settle in for four probably even more difficult years of education. The first two years are primarily focused on the study of basic sciences such as anatomy, physiology, pathology, pharmacology, microbiology, immunology, etc. The second two years are focused on the clinical sciences of medicine, surgery, neurology, psychiatry, obstetrics/gynecology, and of course pediatrics.

In the same way that you worked at excelling during high school so that you could get into an excellent college or university, and then in college you worked at excelling in order to get into medical school, during medical school you must work hard in order to get into a pediatric training program. To get a good pediatric training position it is important to score well on the National Medical Board examinations, to have solid academic performance in medical school, and in particular to have honors during the pediatrics rotations that you take.

During medical school there is plenty of opportunity to change your mind as to which area of medicine you would like to go ultimately into. This happens frequently. However, in my experience, more people change their minds and decide to go into pediatrics after having been exposed to the pediatric rotation, than those who come to medical school with the desire to go into pediatrics and instead pick something else.

After four years of undergraduate school and four more years of medical school comes Internship — that one year which involves more learning than the previous eight years combined. Night and day you eat, drink, and breathe pediatric training (the name “internship” comes from the same word meaning to be imprisoned). It is a long and difficult year! You will be almost continually sleep-deprived.” Internship is followed by another round of National Medical Board examinations. Upon the successful completion of internship and National Boards, you are ready to complete a Residency — an additional two years of intensive pediatric training. During these years you are always at the hospital (Resident implies somebody who lives at the hospital because you spend so much time there that you might as well live there!). After all this training many people pursue a fellowship in some particular area of pediatrics or further residency training as a Chief Resident.

Having completed all these years of training (and delayed gratification), you are finally ready to embark on a journey as a pediatrician.

For me, life in general pediatrics is much different from what it was when I started medical school. By the time you finish undergraduate school, medical school, and residency training, I suspect that pediatrics will go through even greater changes. Particularly in primary care (pediatrics, family practice, internal medicine), the salaries are at the low end of the physician spectrum. As a pediatrician, it will likely be many years before you are able to repay the loans that you took out for your education.

But for all the long arduous training and the relatively low compensation (given the amount of skill you will acquire, the years of training you put in, the risk and responsibility you take), a career in pediatrics is thrilling. It’s a joy to be present at the birth of a child, and deeply moving to help save the life of a child who is faltering in the birth process. It’s a delight to watch children grow, and to help their parents anticipate each stage of development. It’s deeply rewarding to walk with families as they mature.

Even so, make sure to not view your career as “a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.” I found that each step of the journey — the undergraduate years, the medical school years, the residency training — to be rewarding in and of themselves. If you decide that you want to be a pediatrician, make the most of each stage of your journey — a significant part of your life, and the greatest part of your youth, will be spent during your training years. And afterwards, you will be one of the lucky few to enjoy this fascinating and deeply meaningful career.

February 6, 2008
Published on: September 16, 1996
About the Author
Photo of Alan Greene MD
Dr. Greene is a practicing physician, author, national and international TEDx speaker, and global health advocate. He is a graduate of Princeton University and University of California San Francisco.
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Recent Comments

Hello Dr.Greene,
I’m a high school student and have a dream of becoming a Pediatrician but currently I’m not taking subjects that will make me achieve this dream. If given the opportunity to take the subjects that will make me a Peadiatrican should I change considering the fact that I’m actually scared of blood and looking at accident scenes.

Hi Hawa,

Becoming a pediatrician is a great goal. You will have to overcome your fear of looking at blood in order to succeed. The best way to do that is in very small steps. That a biology class where you need to direct a frog (no blood, but you get to see inside something that was alive). Then work your way up. Small steps take time, but they are worth it to achieve your goal.

I hope that helps.
Best, @MsGreene
Note: I am the co-founder of DrGreene.com, but I am not Dr. Greene and I am not a doctor. Please keep that in mind when reading my comments and replies.

Hi my name is Jane. I want to become a pediatrician and would like to know ways I could start learning early. If you have any ideas please let me know.

Hi Jane,

One of the best things you can do is to volunteer at a hospital so you can see first hand what a pediatrician does. That is particularly difficult now, but you may be able to do that in the future. In the meantime, taking online courses or watching videos online about health, biology and anatomy will help you prepare for future classes.

I hope that helps.
Best, @MsGreene
Note: I am the co-founder of DrGreene.com, but I am not Dr. Greene and I am not a doctor. Please keep that in mind when reading my comments and replies.

Hey my name is Brakhia,Upson and i am going to 7 grade this year. I want to become a pediatrician but the thing is i want to start learning early. I am really weak in science but i am working my way up. I know a little about the body, after all i help take care of my 82 year old great grandpa he that has really bad parkinson’s. I am sure your familiar with COVID19, In my opinion i think that the best way to kill it is threw the sun and heat because they say it lives in your nose and starts to affect the rest of your organs so what if there’s a way to heat up the virus to destroy it or weaken its power, That’s my opinion. But if you have any information about the pediatrician thing please contact me.

Hello Brakhia,

It’s wonderful that you are thinking about ways to kill the CoV-2 virus that is responsible for COVID-19. Some researchers have theorized heat may indeed be helpful, but at this time there does not appear to be any well-documented studies on the subject. Until there are studies, we won’t have definitive answers to your question.

Having an inquiring mind is one critical trait for doctors. Keep studying science and asking questions. That will take you a long way on the path to becoming a doctor.

Best, @MsGreene
Note: I am the co-founder of DrGreene.com, but I am not Dr. Greene and I am not a doctor. Please keep that in mind when reading my comments and replies.

Hello my name is Raquel Jarquin I was born in Seaside and I´m a student at Seaside High School.Im in 8th grade and my age is 14 and right now I´m doing this project on being a pediatric because I really want to be one so I was wondering if you could give me any information about it.In addition,I was wondering if there is a summer program I can go to, to be able to learn somethings about it. I don´t have my own email so I´m just going to put my email of school

Hi,
My name is Sylvie,I really love children so i decided to become a pediatrician before. I made this decision i have been looking at some major children illness and i have studied them. But i still need some tips in being a good pediatrician as you. please if you have any ideas let me know

Thanks a lot

Im in 8th grade as well and my project led me to this site ! Exept im in chicago.

Hello,

I am currently a high schooler and I am looking forward to becoming a pediatrician, God willing. I would like to thank you, Dr. Greene, for creating this website with very helpful tips. I understand that it is a difficult process to complete and your grades are a key factor. My grades are mediocre and I do take a lot of AP and Honors. However, they are not all A’s I have some B’s and maybe one C. If I am struggling a little bit in high school will I ever be able to pass in college?

Thank you so much,
Fatemeh Ghasemi

What is the best way to start off as a pediatritian

Britanny

Hello Dr.Greene

I am doing an end of the school year project and I am researching about pediatrics. I would just like to know if I can interview you, if not can you just give me something to write for my power-point presentation .
How will your life be different by achieving this goal?

Specific: What exactly will you accomplish? Does your goal clearly and specifically state what you are trying to achieve? If your goal is particularly large or lofty, try breaking it down into a smaller, specific SMART goal.

Measurable: How will you (and others) know if progress is being made on achieving your goal? Can you quantify or put numbers on your outcome?

Attainable: Is attaining this goal realistic with effort and commitment? Do you have the resources to achieve this goal? If not, how will you get them? Is achieving your goal dependent on anyone else? If so, is it possible to re frame your goal so it only depends on you? What factors may prevent you from accomplishing your goal?

Relevant: Why is this goal important to you? How does this goal reflect your values? What effect will achieving your goal have on your life or on others?

Time-bound: When will you achieve this goal? Again, if your goal is particularly large, try breaking it down into a smaller goal.

Hi Britanny,

Being a pediatrician is a very rewarding job. It’s also a lot of work and very time intensive. As a result, Dr. Greene won’t be able to provide an interview for you. I recommend contacting your own pediatrician for this interview. He or she would likely enjoy knowing that you are inspired by the input they’ve had in your life.

For more information that may help with your paper, here’s another piece Dr. Greene wrote to describe what it’s like to be a pediatrician.

I hope that helps.
Best, @MsGreene
Note: I am the co-founder of DrGreene.com, but I am not Dr. Greene and I am not a doctor. Please keep that in mind when reading my comments and replies.

Hello Dr.Greene

I am doing an end of the school year project and I am researching about pediatrics. I would just like to know if I can interview you, if not can you just give me something to write in my research paper? Like was medical school really worth it or does your salary affect you positively or negatively, things of that sort. Would really mean a lot.
Thank you for your time reading this post.

Hi Miriam,

Dr. Greene says, “As a pediatrician, it will likely be many years before you are able to repay the loans you took out for your education. But, for all the long arduous training and the relatively low compensation (given the amount of skill you will acquire, the years of training you put in, the risk and responsibility you take), a career in pediatrics is thrilling.”

I hope that helps.
Best, @MsGreene
Note: I am the co-founder of DrGreene.com, but I am not Dr. Greene and I am not a doctor. Please keep that in mind when reading my comments and replies.

Hi Dr. Green,
I am a middle school student in Illinois. I am currently working on the end of the year research project and we need an interview. I am researching pediatrics. could I possibly Interview you?

Thanks,
M.L

Hi Melody,
Because of time constraints, Dr. Greene isn’t taking student interviews from kids who are not his patients. But I bet your own pediatrician would love to do this interview!
Best,
@MsGreene

Good day, Dr Greene, this information helped me so much! I’m a year 11 high school student and will be entering year 12 next term. I’m currently having troubles with Chemistry and thinking about dropping it next term, however, doing great in biology… Will you please tell If dropping chemistry is a right thing to do??

Hi Shanti,

Thanks for writing in.

If you are considering a career in medicine, you will need chemistry. If you are doing poorly in chemistry this term, you might consider dropping it now and taking a course during the summer that will help prepare you for chemistry, then taking chemistry in grade 12. I don’t know what the options there are for you to take preliminary work where you live. If there are none, or if you do not or can not wait to take the course in grade 12, consider hiring a tutor to help you understand the concepts that are difficult for you so you will do well in the course.

I hope that helps.
Best, @MsGreene
Note: I am the co-founder of DrGreene.com, but I am not Dr. Greene and I am not a doctor. Please keep that in mind when reading my comments and replies.

Hello! I would like to ask if radiologic technology a good premed course in becoming pediatrician?

Hello, my name is suad, i just wanted to ask you what did you mean exactly by the salary goes down, will a pediatrician’s salary be less in the future? and the education will be more expensive, would it be hard to pay your loan for the “expensive education”

Hello, my name is Earlshala. I am 20 years old and I am on my 2nd year while attending a community college in graduating with an associates degree in early childhood education (Spring 2018). I have a very strong passion for children and the well-being of people. I love both Science (particularly biology) and Humanities. I love working with children hands-on and i feel like it is my calling, but I would like to continue to do something greater in that area.. Personally, I have faith that I can do anything, and I want to have a better life (which requires hard work and patience in which I’m willing to try) and to be an impact to someone.. Already being exposed to the adult-lifestyle.. respectfully, what was 3 of your greatest challenges (pertaining to school) while on your journey to become the person that you are today and do you feel like your existing salary was worth the journey?
Also, thank you for the information that was provided above.

Hi Dr.Greene. My name is TJ and I have always dreamed of becoming a Pediatrician. I attend a magnet school in Louisiana, I will be entering my 11th grade year this coming school year, I have all honors classes, I do great in math, I got an A in science, but I got a B in chemistry. I want to know what recommendations do you have to help prepare me to enter a Pre-Med major in college and to start preparing for the MCAT. Thank you for your time.

Hey Dr.Greene

I’m in grade 12 now and i don’t really have the compulsory subjects for me to study paediatrician but I’ve got Life Science and I’d love to study paediatrician so I require your help please

Hi,

My name is Felicia. I’m currently a senior at John F. Kennedy High School. My dream is to become a pediatrician. I’m applying to take Incarnate word university. Although i am not very sure as to what i should put as my major. would it be Biology (BS) OR Biology (BA) ?

Hi i’m in 6th grade and wondering if you can tell me how its like being a pediatrician

Hi Felicia,

Thanks for writing in.

Same schools offer a BS in Biology and others offer a BA in biology. It’s wise to look at the school where you are applying and see what they offer, then list that as your choice.

I hope that helps.
Best, @MsGreene
Note: I am the co-founder of DrGreene.com, but I am not Dr. Greene and I am not a doctor. Please keep that in mind when reading my comments and replies.

Hi,

My name is Emily and I’m currently a sophomore at Rice University. I, like many others, went into college with a set path in mind, but realized that it simply wasn’t for me. I’ve been doing a lot of thinking and I’ve come to the realization that I would love to be a pediatrician. One problem–my major up until this point has been computational and applied math and I haven’t taken a single science class since high school. I realize that if I were to switch to a pre-med track, I would have to take an extra year or two to graduate and I am ok with that, but before I even think about it, I want to make sure it’s actually still possible. I’ve read all the horror stories about how hard it is to get into med school and I feel as if it’s just too late. Do you have any insight or advice?

Thanks in advanced,

Emily

Hi Emily,

Thanks so much for writing in.

Getting into med school is tough, but not impossible. Your math background will be helpful, but undoubtedly you’ll need to take life science courses to qualify for med school. You will also need to score well on MCATS and you will need to distinguish yourself in other ways, such as volunteering in a medical setting.

Wishing you all the best in your education and beyond.

@MsGreene
Note: I am the co-founder of DrGreene.com, but I am not Dr. Greene and I am not a doctor. Please keep that in mind when reading my comments and replies.

Hi, I am Mia
What is the typical career path for Pediatrician?

hi ! i wanna be a paediatric when im older.im currently studying nursing and wants to set my goal to get into a medical school under paediatric. but im unsure the routes to be one, mind giving some tips?

Hi, thanks so much for writing in!

Dr. Greene writes above, “Whatever your current major, you must take courses in the core premedical sciences. These include organic chemistry, physical chemistry, physics, biology, and probably calculus. Your grades in these core courses will be particularly important for medical school admission. They will also help prepare you for the MCATs (the standardized testing which plays a significant role in medical school admissions.) To have your medical school application seriously considered, outstanding grades and MCAT scores are important. Once your application is considered, one of the things that will be looked for is your exposure to the world of health and medicine during your undergraduate years. Particularly favorable are a track record of medical research and volunteering in a medical setting. For pediatrics it is especially useful if the volunteer work you have done is with children.”

Hope that helps!
Alexandra (caring helper at DrGreene.com, not a doctor)

Hey there Dr. Greene!

My dream is to become a doctor. Like for example; an ER doctor. But, I had a change in mind and would LOVE to become a pediatrician. I’m 18 and about to be continuing school at a community college this fall. I don’t know what I should major in. I’m confused. Another problem was that I have no hands-on experience into what a life of a pediatrician is like. And I would love to get some advice. I need help, pleaaase!

Hi Natty,

Congratulations. You’ve chosen a great career.

At community college, take as many science courses as you can, particularly biology, anatomy, and other life sciences. Work hard. Get excellent grades and transfer to a top university to finish your bachelors degree.

The best way to get hands-on experience is to volunteer for your local children’s hospital. At first you will not be doing direct patient work, but over time you will be able to do more with the children. This is very important and will help you get into medical school.

It is wise to have all your blood retested. It’s not uncommon for blood types to be different than they are thought.

I hope that helps.
Best, @MsGreene
Note: I am the co-founder of DrGreene.com, but I am not Dr. Greene and I am not a doctor. Please keep that in mind when reading my comments and replies.

Hi! I am a 14 year old in the 8th grade at a magnet jr/sr high school in florida. Everyone tells me not to be a pediatrician and instead a dermatologist or another doctor. I do well in math. Should I still keep pursuing pediatrics? I thought I should do pediatrics because I love children and have always wanted to be a doctor.

Hi Layla,
How exciting that you want to be a pediatrician! I think if you can do what you love, that’s an amazing gift in life. It’s probably wise to explore a number of different options and see which one feels best for you.
Hope that helps!
Alexandra (caring helper at drgreene.com, not a doctor)

Hi my name is Christine and I’m not from the States am from Guyana so I’m 13 and am in form 2. I was wondering if you’ll have to get any knowledge on like how to treat a disease or will i learn that when I’m training?

Hi, Dr. Greene. I’m currently attending a community college only because I could not decide between the two careers that I wanted. The good thing is that I have finally decided and I am looking to change my major. I have decided that being a pediatrician is what I’d like to do. The bad thing is that im a little confused on what classes to take at a community college. Can you please give me some advice on what classes I should take that would transfer to a university?

Hi, Dr.Greene! I am in 7th grade, but I would love to become a pediatrician when I grow up. I am two years ahead in math right now. Do you think that I would have two years less of math than science classes in college then?

Carly,

Math and science courses are very important for students who want to go into medicine. Being two years ahead will allow you to take more advanced courses. That will be an advantage when applying for med school.

I hope that helps.
Best, @MsGreene
Note: I am the co-founder of DrGreene.com, but I am not Dr. Greene and I am not a doctor. Please keep that in mind when reading my comments and replies.

hello Dr Greene my name is Ay, i am 14 and in grade 9. I have always wanted to be a pediatrician ever since I was old enough to understand the concept. But how does someone like me get some kind of hands-on practice even though I am not in university yet

Ayomide,

Contact your local hospital and ask about their volunteer program. You will likely start out doing non-patient related activities, but over time you’ll be able to do more and more.

Best, @MsGreene
Co-founder & Executive Producer DrGreene.com, Mom
Note: I answer a lot of questions on DrGreene.com, I am the co-founder of DrGreene.com, Dr. Greene’s business partner and wife, but I am a not doctor. Please keep that in mind when reading my comments and replies.

Hi Dr. Greene. I`m in my Grade 11 and I am still worried on what pre-med course shall I take because I want to be a pediatrician.What do you think is the best pre-med course to take?Why?

Rian,

In grade 11 and 12, take as many math and sciences courses as your school schedule will allow. This is a great foundation for college.

When you enter college, seek out an academic counselor and ask them what major and courses they offer that will help you achieve your goals. It will include many math and science, especially human biology, courses.

Best, @MsGreene
Co-founder & Executive Producer DrGreene.com, Mom
Note: I answer a lot of questions on DrGreene.com, I am the co-founder of DrGreene.com, Dr. Greene’s business partner, but I am a not doctor. Please keep that in mind when reading my comments and replies.

Hi, I’m a sophomore in highschool and have been wanting to be a Pediatrician for quiet some time, I have been struggling with math most my life, do you think that will become and issue as a pursue Pediatrics?

Charlie,

Math and science are important for all doctors. Struggling with math does not mean you can’t become a pediatrician, but it does mean you will have to work extra hard.

Best,
@MsGreene

Hello, my name is Sierra. I’m in grade 11, not your average student living in the now. But I want to know my future, I’m in the applied stream currently and hoping to go to college and take sciences and maths. I wanted to know if I could continue my path way to becoming a paediatrician through university after college although I took applied classes in high school?
I hope to hear back from you!
Sierra

I’m now in Grade 10. My dream is not to be a Pediatrician, but one day I just feel that I want to be a doctor (Pediatrician). What advice can you give me in order to become a Pediatrician?

Hi Christine,

You’ve found the right article. Dr. Greene gives some very specific answers above.

Best,
@MsGreene
Co-founder & Executive Producer DrGreene.com, Mom

HI my name is Shania banks and i’m 24 years old and I just got my job to being a pediatrician. today i was in tears when i finally got my bachlors degree i want thank you Mr greene for all your edvice

Hey shania, my name is Kesia and am in 11th grade. Am doing this project about my career on how to become a pediatrician. Am surprise that you already getting started on your career at the age of 24, that’s great congratulation. Please reply to my email, i would like to know what did you do to started on your career, classes you take and what did you major in.

Congratulations Shania!

Hi my name is Farah and I’m 18 . My goal is to be a pediatrician but a lot of people think that I won’t be able to achieve this goal because of my family background and also I will be attending a community college I worry that my knowledge is not enough to be a doctor a lots of people say it’s a long and hard journey any advices.

Hi Farah,

Work very hard in community college, take science and math courses, and get great grades. This will put you in good shape to go to a university. Do the same at university.

It’s not easy, but don’t let other people discourage you.

Best,
@MsGreene

Hello Dr. Greene,
I am working on a health professions project for school and I would love to ask you a couple of questions that relate to you and the pediatric department.

1. Why did you choose to become a pediatrician?
2. What do you love the most about your job?
3. How long have you been working as a pediatrician and how long did it take you to become one?
4. How hard and long did it take you to achieve becoming a Pediatrician?
5. How many hours do you generally work each week?
6. Are you ever on call ? If so how does that feel?
7. What is one thing that scared you became a pediatrician?
8. What are some things I should expect that I can’t find out with research on being a pediatrician?
9. What was the hardest case you ever had to Handel?
10. What’s the hardest part of becoming a pediatrician? Medical school ? Residency ? Etc.
11. How many years did you spend as an intern and a resident ?

Hello Haneen,

Dr. Greene wrote this Q&A to answer questions for people just like you. You can pull most of the answers out by reading above.

Best,
@MsGreene

I often feel stressed because I am constantly told that I probably won’t make it as a pediatrician. Why is that? I come from a low income family and I am 17 and starting my college career at a Community College and moving on once I graduate here. What are the steps into becoming a pediatrician. Why do others feel as though that is an unreachable and unrealistic goal for me?

Becoming a pediatrician is very hard. It is especially suited to individuals who excel in math and science, who have excellent memories, and are great with people.

I say, work hard at becoming a pediatrician and prove them all wrong!

Chanda
Hi Dr.Greene . I am an African girl specifically from Zambia. I didn’t have a specific career choice until I found out about pediatricians and I loved the idea of becoming one. Well enough , I am taking sciences at school but things like doing voluntary work at hospitals by young people isn’t really a thing here its quite difficult to do that. But anyway all I need right now is encouragement especially from someone like you because I tend to get really discouraged when I just get one bad grade which will eventually mess up my overall score. I have a lot of worries to tell you about and questions to ask but this will do for now.
Your reply will be highly appreciated.

I have been trying to figure out a major for years now and becoming a pediatrician has always stayed on my mind. How was the work load? Such as the difficulty of classes and things like that? I know I can do anything if I apply my self but I am still struggling to find a calling in the medical field.

Hi dr.Greene

My aim is to become a pediatrician
n my question is do we need to do MBBS ???

Hi Dr. Greene,

I am a sophomore undergrad in college currently, I have always wanted to be a pediatrician i even considered calling myself the “child whisperer” because of this unique gift i have. Okay enough of the rambling, Do you have to have volunteer hours before applying to medical school? Are there any other requirements to apply for medical school? And what are unique studying tips you have for the MCAT?

Thank you!!

hello Dr. Greene

i have one question for you, I want to become a pediatric but don’t if you have to be a us citizen or a permanent resident, so hopefully you can answer my question. Thank you

Hello, Eder.

International students can apply for medical school. Entry to medical school is tough for everyone. If you’re in high school now, take science courses, volunteer in health related fields, such as a hospital, and do the things it takes to get into an excellent college or university. That’s the first step.

Best,
@MsGreene

Hi Dr.Green I really love medicine and I like to have a career in it. could you give a estimated expense on a pediatric, and how much you can earn from it. thank you very much

Hi Ilyas,

There isn’t a simple answer to your question. In the United States, the published average salary is $175,000 for a general pediatrician. This amount can be lower or higher — which is how averages work. In other countries, the average is likely different.

Hope that helps.

Best,
@MsGreene

Sorry, I have a question that has been bothering my mind. I am studying presently physiology and I want to become a paediatric doctor. Please how is this possible. Thank you I will be waiting for your reply sir.

Sorry, I have a question that has been bothering my mind. I school in Nigeria study the course physiology and I want to become a paediatric doctor….please how is this possibly.

Hi, I am a sophmore’s at an Arts High School. I love theatre, but I am drawn to neurology. I was fascinated by a show called Blackbox. I really want to help people. My dad died from a GBM, AA4, when I was very young so my mom thinks this unexpected change could be due to my father. I don’t think I want to go into neuro-oncology. I would love to start a club at my high school bringing students together with doctors and conferences so that I and other students can start understanding different fields and the path necessary to get there. Thank you!

Starting a club at your high school sounds like a great idea. I suggest you invite your own pediatrician or family practice doctor to speak. Don’t forget to include other healthcare professionals, like nurses in your speaking roster.

Best,
@MsGreene

Hi Dr. Greene,
Your post was very inspiring and helpful! I’m a junior in high school and my dream career is to become a pediatrician. I volunteer many hours at my local hospital and coach kids basketball at my local basketball gym. My grades in high school are very good with two “B'” but my goal is always all “A’s”. I participate in many clubs and I am in my school’s Publication class where we create the yearbook and our school magazine. I know that I can do it and get through the years of school but I think I’m just a little nervous about if I would make it. Do you have any words of advice or encouragement? I am dedicated, compassionate, and a perfectionist but sometimes I get nervous.

what percentage do we need in +2 to get admission for medicine

how much grade do we need in +2 to get MBBS

Please is there a possibility for me to offer early childhood education at the university to become a paediatrician?

Very great article, I certainly like this blog, keep on it.

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