The Dangers of Inhaled Aerosols or Huffing

I am living every parent’s nightmare — my son Keith is dead. Dr. Greene, I am fighting a battle. It’s a battle to teach as many people as I can about what is known as “huffing” — inhaling of aerosol products, of any kind, from a plastic bag. It’s really frightening because aerosol is so accessible to kids. In Kinnelon it is the #1 “drug” problem that we are facing. Yet not one adult who I have encountered has any idea about huffing. I don’t want any family to suffer the agony of losing a child. Help me save even one life!
Margaret Wagner – Kinnelon

Dr. Greene’s Answer:

Teens don’t remember what it was like when they were babies, but their parents remember. We remember rocking them to sleep and the intimacy of feeding. We remember later when we helped them learn to go on the potty and to tie their shoes. We remember the first day of kindergarten, and sleepovers, and helping them with their homework. We remember sitting worried by their bedsides when they were sick. We remember vacations and Halloween costumes and birthday parties. How jarringly tragic when a child dies suddenly, needlessly–when there are no more birthdays to celebrate.

“Huffing,” or inhaling volatile substances, is becoming increasingly popular among children, especially among 12- to 14-year-olds (Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, 1998;152(8):781–786). Huffing can kill the very first time children experiment with it. Alarmingly, about 17% of eighth-graders report having done it (National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2004). Margaret, you are not alone; every day, children die from huffing.

A bunch of guys get together to hang out. One of the older ones (not yours) describes a cheap, cool, legal way to get high. It’s a rush–and there’s nothing wrong with it. All it takes is stuff around the home. An impromptu scavenger hunt produces some room deodorizer or some typewriter correction fluid and some empty soda cans, balloons, or plastic bags. Just spray the stuff in the can or bag and inhale. The kids feel mature. They feel the thrill of doing something a little out of bounds. They feel the rush from the chemicals.

At first these chemicals act as stimulants. The kids feel uninhibited, powerful, and are prone to impulsive behavior. If they keep inhaling, they start to feel drunk. Speech becomes slurred, and the gait becomes staggered. Often they begin to hallucinate. Drowsiness and sleep follow the euphoria. But nightfall, the high is interrupted when one of them drops dead suddenly.

Huffing can stop a strong, young heart without warning–a heart that should have kept on beating during graduation, while getting married, and in synch with that of a newborn baby.

Besides sudden cardiac arrest (the most common cause of death from inhalants), huffing can kill quickly in a number of other ways. Motor vehicle accidents such as you have described, falls, and other traumatic injuries are common and horrible. Others die from suffocation, burns, suicide (from the depression that can follow the high), and from choking–on their own vomit. About 22% of those who die from huffing do so the first time they try it (Human Toxicology, 1989;8:261–269).

When huffing doesn’t kill quickly, it damages the body each time–especially the brain. Huffing can cause memory loss, impaired concentration, hearing loss, loss of coordination, and permanent brain damage. Chronic use can cause permanent heart, lung, liver, and kidney damage as well. Solvents (found in glues, paints, and polishes), fuels (such as butane), nitrites (found in deodorizers), and almost any kind of aerosol spray can be responsible.

How can you tell if your child might be huffing?

Most huffing takes place with friends (although kids who sniff correction fluid in class when their teachers turn away are not uncommon). Be observant of your child and his or her friends. Inhalants gradually leave the body for 2 weeks following huffing–mostly through exhaling. The characteristic odor is the biggest clue. Be on the lookout for breath or clothing that smells like chemicals. Look for clothing stains. Watch for spots or sores around the mouth. Nausea, lack of appetite, weight loss, nervousness, restlessness, declining school performance and outbursts of anger can all be signs of inhalant abuse. A drunk, dazed, or glassy-eyed appearance might mean your child is abusing inhalants right now. If you suspect or discover that you child is huffing, get professional help. Treating inhalant abuse is very difficult and requires expert intervention. Withdrawal symptoms may last for weeks. The relapse rate without a long-term (2-year) program is very high.

What can you do to prevent your child from huffing?

Preventing huffing is far better than trying to treat an inhalant addiction. Talking with your child about it is more powerful than anything else (NIDA Research Monograph, 1988;85:8–29). Start talking with your child about it now. Although huffing peaks between the ages of 12 and 15 years, it often starts “innocently” in children only 6 to 8 years old (Pediatrics, 1996;97:420-3). Literally thousands of easily available substances can be inhaled, so you can’t keep your child away from them. You can, however, educate and inspire. Begin talking with your child about inhalants by the time he or she is in kindergarten. This is also an important age to set an example in your own use of intoxicating substances. Talk and role-play often about the important skill of being able to resist peer pressure.

Most parents and children are unaware of the extreme dangers of sniffing or huffing inhalants. I hope, Margaret, that word of your profound tragedy saves the futures of many parents’ children.

May 9, 2008

Dr. Alan Greene

Dr. Greene is a practicing physician, author, national and international TEDx speaker, and global health advocate. He is a graduate of Princeton University and University of California San Francisco.

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  1. WearyAnd WorriedMum

    I just found out my son is inhaling deodorant spray and I didn’t have a clue that it’s even a thing! I am in complete disbelief because my son is such a good boy. His teachers are saying he is well mannered, well liked by his peers.
    I took him to the GP tonight frightened that he may be poisoned from fume he’s had but it seemed like we are being referred to our family GP anyway.

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    • Dear Weary Mum,

      I am so sorry for you and your son.

      Getting professional help is key. As you can see from others who have written here who have tried to stop, it’s not easy. Your son may need a counselor in addition to a medical doctor’s help.

      I’m so glad you found out.
      Best, @MsGreene
      Note: I am the co-founder of DrGreene.com, but I am not Dr. Greene and I am not a doctor. Please keep that in mind when reading my comments and replies.

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  2. Unknown

    Hey,

    So when I was younger I used to huff deodorant a lot and I did it purely because of the hallucinations it gave me. I stopped for a couple of years and then just recently I found a can of rexona in my room. So I decided because I was bored I wold huff it.

    Now tonight I went on a extremely disgusting trip and it scared [redacted] me. [redacted]

    It was really disgusting and not of my own mind and I know there were spirits because there is no [redacted] way my mind could think such scary things.

    Is it normal to hallucinate this hard? I took about 6 breaths of rexona.

    I don’t plan on doing this again. I’m too scared to try.

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    • Dear Unknown,

      First, I want to explain why we redacted some of your text. Your story is very personal and I appreciate that. The language you used (in my opinion) was appropriate to describe your terrible experience, but it’s graphic. As a site we have guidelines about what we do and don’t allow in our comments. We need to follow those guidelines for all comments, including yours even though they aptly described your experience.

      No doubt, what you experienced was bad. Is it normal to hallucinate “this hard”? I’d say it may be your new normal. Likely many people experience bad trips. This is just another reason huffing is a bad idea.

      I hope you feel better soon. If you do not, see a physician and get help.

      Best, @MsGreene
      Note: I am the co-founder of DrGreene.com, but I am not Dr. Greene and I am not a doctor. Please keep that in mind when reading my comments and replies.

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  3. Ryley

    I am 13, I have only inhaled it 2 time yesterday, someoNE
    said you can get high off it and told me I should try it. I have a very sore throat and I fell sick. but my sister had the flu and I might of just got the flu from her. I don’t know if I’m sick because of the aerosol or the flu.

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    • Ryley,

      Sorry you’re feeling bad today. The symptoms you describe are consistent with both huffing and the flu. With the flu you will have a fever. You won’t have a fever with huffing.

      Either way, huffing has serious long term side effects for a very brief high.

      I hope that helps.
      Best, @MsGreene
      Note: I am the co-founder of DrGreene.com, but I am not Dr. Greene and I am not a doctor. Please keep that in mind when reading my comments and replies.

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  4. Maddy

    I was just wondering, is it possible to keep doing this forever and not die?

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    • Hi Maddy,
      My guess is you don’t want to find out the answer to that question! Better for anyone who’s doing this to get help as soon as possible.
      Hope that helps!
      Alexandra (caring helper at drgreene.com, not a doctor)

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  5. HuffMan

    Funny to read this because the last time I huffed was yesterday

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    • Glad you read it. Hope you’ll think about what Dr. Greene had to say.

      Best, @MsGreene
      Note: I am the co-founder of DrGreene.com, but I am not Dr. Greene and I am not a doctor. Please keep that in mind when reading my comments and replies.

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  6. Anonymous

    Hi,
    I am 14 and havenā€™t been doing huffing but managed to swallow and inhale some deodorant yesterday after messing about with my friends with deodorant which resulted in me inhaling it and getting some in my mouth. I then started to have cold like symptoms, sneezing, coughing which has carried on and I still have it now. Should I see the doctor about this?

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    • Anonymous,

      Yes, you definitely should see your doctor. Tell him or her about your symptoms and that you were messing around with aerosol deodorant when they started. He or she will be able to help you.

      @MsGreene
      Note: I am the co-founder of DrGreene.com, but I am not Dr. Greene and I am not a doctor. Please keep that in mind when reading my comments and replies.

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  7. Anon

    I need some advice my son is 14 and I haven’t caught him but I believe in my heart he is inhaling deodorant as the signs are all there. He is abusive to me has mood swings all I have smelt strong smell of Deodrant when I arrive home he is always popping up to the shop he was lying and saying he was helping his friend with a paper round when I asked his friend he has not had a paper round in months I think he is going out that early and getting high i have sent him to stay with his dad but I am desperately trying to let his dad know-that he has a problem his eyes lids and under his eyes are yellow and looks sparkled all the time all the tops are off every deodorant can or aftershave also keeps taking my hand sanitiser can that be inhaled ? he also smokes weed this I do actually know his dad is saying that I’m a bad parent and I have just passed him of to him but I feel he doesn’t do this when he is in his care my son has now said he doesn’t want to see me as I have started to realise all his lies and he has been rumbled so is telling his dad that he is left out and feels isolating and he is going for walks to clear his head at 6 in the morning he hates going to his dads as he is bored all the time and wants to be at mine we’re all his friends are and now I’m not being a pushover has now turned it so they feel sort for him I have tried to warn him that he has a drug problem but instead I get abuse hurled at me and told I’m just not a good mother I also gave a baby and can’t tolerate his antics but no one is listening what should I do ?

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  8. Luke-James

    Hello, I’ve been huffing for 2 years I am now 16 and started when I was 14 I use 2 aerosols in 3 days and I just have a urge to go up stairs and use it basically I get a towel I fold it up put it over my face and push the spray into my mouth and spray and take a deep breath in and get a high off it, I need to stop as I’m only 16 I’m very clever got all good GCSEs got A*s and I know it’s young but my girlfriend is 23 weeks pregnant with my son, and I’m scared of not seeing him grow up because of my stupid addiction, can someone tell me how to stop šŸ˜©

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    • Luke-James,

      Get help. Don’t wait. Tell your parents. Tell a school counselor. Tell a priest or pastor. Ask him or her to help you find professional help.

      Huffing is very addictive and deadly. Don’t wait.

      @MsGreene
      Note: I am the co-founder of DrGreene.com, but I am not Dr. Greene and I am not a doctor. Please keep that in mind when reading my comments and replies.

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      • Luke-James

        Thank you, I’ll try.

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    • Gavin Driscoll

      I was doing it at your age, I did it when I was in care the stupidest thing I’ve ever done, think about it this way, 1 wrong move and your lungs could freeze, just like that, I did it 4 too years, I have problems with my eye site and getting constant headaches and eye strain, if what I say don’t change your ways nothing will, good luck

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  9. Lawrence Lu

    Hello. My name is Lawrence and I am currently twenty years old. I don’t intentionally huff these substances, but I have this scented air freshener placed in my room that lasted probably about 3-4 weeks, and I’ve kept it in my room for many months even though there is still some liquid in it, but it doesn’t really give much of a scent, except when I sniff it myself. Also, I got another one that lasted probably just as long placed together with the first one. After reading about these I decided to throw them both away a couple of days ago. Will I be facing any illnesses or diseases in the future? Especially when I am in my room constantly and breathing these in my sleep?

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  10. Jackal

    I literally cannot believe that this poor woman has never met an adult who knows what huffing is. That blows my mind. I thought just about everyone in the world had at least heard of sniffing glue! That is a dangerous island of ignorance. I mean, wow.

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  11. Anonymous

    I was in my sisters bedroom and sprayed deoderant into my mouth because I didn’t know it was harmful. My sister got mad and told me it was poisones and so I ran to the bathroom and washed my mouth continuously with toothpaste. Am I going to get hurt or something??!!

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    • Anonymous,

      There probably won’t be long-term negative consequences from one brief exposure, but she is right. And you are wise to never do it again.

      Best,
      @MsGreene

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  12. Shadekul islam

    I was also a glue sniffer.

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  13. Lauren

    I am 13 years old and I cannot stop doing this. Me and my friend do it almost everyday for the past few weeks. I used to do it a long time ago but I am doing it again but I cannot stop. I sniff a bottle of deodorant almost everyday and I’m getting headaches and always feel sick. How can I stop?

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    • Lauren,

      GET HELP NOW!

      As you say, you can’t stop doing it on your own. Tell your parents you need help. You want to stop, but you can’t. Tell your doctor you need help. You want to stop, but you can’t. It is your best hope for a healthy adult life.

      NOW is the time to act! Do NOT wait one more day.

      Please come back and let other know you’re okay … or not. Either way, we want to know.

      With real fear for your future,
      @MsGreene

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      • Lauren

        I still do it tho when I wrote to use I stopped but I am doing it again! It’s just a habit for me and it’s getting worse!

        CAN YOU DIE OF IT??

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        • Lauren,

          Yes, you can die from huffing. I know it’s very addicting. You need help to stop. Tell your parents, a school counselor, a priest or pastor — anyone who can help you find the help you need, before it’s too late.

          @MsGreene
          Note: I am the co-founder of DrGreene.com, but I am not Dr. Greene and I am not a doctor. Please keep that in mind when reading my comments and replies.

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          • Lauren

            I’m scared to ask for help, I feel ashamed but it’s very addictive. I don’t want my mum to loose me but I don’t want to tell anyone the only who knows is my friend and she does it with me. I’m so ashamed and I’m scared of what’s going to happen.

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          • Lauren,

            You may need to stop seeing this friend. She’s not helping you.

            Consider confiding in a school counselor, teacher, pastor or priest. You need help and every time you huff you are running a risk. There is no safe huffing. You need help immediately to stop.

            @MsGreene
            Note: I am the co-founder of DrGreene.com, but I am not Dr. Greene and I am not a doctor. Please keep that in mind when reading my comments and replies.

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          • Lauren

            I feel ashamed to talk to my mum or even anyone. I can’t talk to my parents about it because I am scared if they judge me. I don’t know what to do anymore!

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          • Lauren,

            If you don’t talk to your parents and something happens to you, they will be so very sad. They will wish you had talked to them. More than you can know.

            How about this idea — make a voice memo on your phone and play it back to them. That way you won’t have to get the words out when you are face to face. You can just press the button and tell them, without having to actually tell them. Can you do that?

            Very worried, @MsGreene
            Note: I am the co-founder of DrGreene.com, but I am not Dr. Greene and I am not a doctor. Please keep that in mind when reading my comments and replies.

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    • Gavin Driscoll

      I was doing it at your age, I did it when I was in care the stupidest thing I’ve ever done, think about it this way, 1 wrong move and your lungs could freeze, just like that, I did it 4 too years, I have problems with my eye site and getting constant headaches and eye strain, if what I say don’t change your ways nothing will, good luck

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      • Lauren

        Thank you for giving me advicešŸ˜€ Luckily I haven’t did it in 2-3 days I know it’s not long but least I’m trying! I will get back to yous all if anything goes wrong! The next time if I do it i feel ok to talk to my parents. Thank yous all for your help I will get back :)

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        • Maddy

          Good luck! I hope it all gets better! :)

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  14. James

    When I was 16 y/o I huffed a lot aerosol cans alone in my bedroom, thankfully I no longer do this and I’m still alive to tell the tale (though I will be honest sometimes when I use my aerosol can the “proper way” I do get a split second pang in my heart that tells me to use again but now I know better and I ain’t going back down that rabbit hole ever ever ever again!).

    Normally I do not comment on articles etc. but I do feel somewhat compelled to write this as it may just help someone else.

    Regarding the signs you wrote about above to tell if your child is using inhalants all (or at least most) of them are true to what I experienced and should not be ignored but I also experienced extremely sore chemical burns on my fingers and my hands (not just around my mouth and nose) caused by the “run off” liquid from the inhalant aerosol. They would occur whether I used a towel or sock to spray the aerosol into then huff at the same time or if I huffed directly from the can (back then there were cans made by a certain company which I won’t name, they had sliding tops and you could put your finger in front of the hole where the spray should come out and huff the aerosol that would be forced out the top through the mechanism used to make the “slider” work).

    I really hope this helps someone as this type of drug abuse is among the most harmful and addictive anyone can experience…. I’m now a 25 y/o and reading through the comments and article I feel VERY VERY lucky that I was caught by my mother and sister in the act (although I lied and claimed I was using the aerosol as a flamethrower and the overwhelming smell was merely incidental). I never got professional help and I’ve never actually admitted that’s what I was doing (sometimes I wish I did get therapy or something to find out why I did such a stupid thing) though I’m fairly certain my family knew I’d lied cause my story didn’t quite add up but they let me deal with it my own way and I guess it did work because I no longer use.

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    • James,

      Thanks for sharing your story. I’m really glad you made it out the other side. So many do not.

      Best,
      @MsGreene

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    • Concerned Sister

      I walked into my brothers room this morning, his door is always shut so that wasnt odd, but what was odd was the overwhelming smell. At first I thought it was nail polish remover but then when I asked him what it was at first he said “what smell?” Then I said it smells like paint or something. And he said..”Oh its probably the gloves I spray painted last night”. This was odd to me but it is something stupid he would truly do. So I didnt think much of it but the words “I better not find out you are sniffing that stuff” just came out of my mouth. I have no reason to think he has nor would ever do that. It was just an involuntary comment. But then I looked around his room amd made mental notes of three three visible cans. Two were computer duster and one was green fas for airsoft guns. He also mentioned he has air freshener(he initially thought that may be what i was smelling) so then I made him open his window and lectured him quickly on the deadly/fatal nature of inhalents and then left. I live 45 min away so I visit every weekend and so I cannot tell if this was an isolated incident or not. He does not seem to have any of the symptoms of inhalent abuse no drunkenness no smell on his breath no sores on his face except acne. His grooming has changed and is more aggitated these days. He has also become a “loner”. But he is also 15 and these changes did not happen over night it has been about a year or so since he started changing. As a former user do you think this sounds like experimenting or am I an over paranoid sister?

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  15. Brian Robertson

    When I was a teenager I inhaled butane gas on occasion and thought it was great just recently I took ill and was suffering from depression so I started self medicating with gas it seemed to be the only thing that helped I wasn’t enjoying the experience doing the gas but it changed the way I was feeling for a while after a bit of time I was buzzing at least 10 cans a day the worst of all was the campfire gas but I didn’t realise what I was doing to my body because my sister started asking what was wrong with my breathing but to me I thought it was fine I gained a lot of weight and found it a struggle to walk anywhere until one day my sister found out my secret and pleaded me to stop if not for myself for my niece and nephew’s so I tried and failed time after time to a point where my family don’t trust me because of the lies and we no longer speak but by chance the doctor gave me a pill called martazapine and right away I could feel it working that was 3 year’s ago now I am back to my old self and the thought of buzzing gas makes me sick but I’ve lost what means the most to me my family

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    • Brian,

      Thank you for sharing your story. We hope others will read it and perhaps learn from your experiences.

      Best,
      @MsGreene

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  16. angela

    My 27 yr neighbor IS doing this, which I’m not bothered about, but what is worrying me is the fumes I’m inhaling from his abuse. I suffer from asthma and copd. Also, I have heart trouble. The last few weeks my chest as been really bad and I can’t get rid of a dry cough. When I’m in the passage of the stairwell I can’t breath as for the fumes. Is this effecting my health cause of his abuse

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    • Angela,

      You don’t have many options. You could report his abuse to the police, but I don’t know if they would be able to do anything. You could ask him to stop or go to another location, but I doubt that will be met with a positive response. You could try air filters in your apartment, but that still doesn’t change the fumes in the stairwell. Or you could move, which I assume is not an easy thing to do. However, moving may be what is needed to save your life.

      So sorry you are going through this.

      @MsGreene

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  17. Jennifer

    My boyfriend of 25 passed away last month from huffing. We were happy… I had no clue. It has changed my life drastically as we were friends since Jr.High.

    To anyone who huffs… Know that your life isn’t just your own. Even if it doesn’t always seem like it; people out there love you and it’s not worth the risk. Even if it’s embarassing to admit what you’re doing- I hope you try to find help.

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    • Dear Jennifer,

      Thank you for sharing this tragic story. It will help others. That doesn’t diminish your pain and we are so sorry for your loss.

      Sincerely,
      @MsGreene

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  18. Pauline Rogers

    My daughter is dead now R.I.P. She died at 25yrs old At 17yrs she got sick ending up with kidney problems. They failed completely, nothing to do with inhaling aerosols. They were failing for awhile she then ended up on Dialysis. That was a terrible time for her ,she never complained. By her 21st birthday she was in fair spirits and we her Parents threw a party for her. She met a young man and fell in love, after awhile i noticed she was not the same person. She started asking me to buy her large deodorant claiming she smelled and needed them to help with that . Like a fool i believed her (never thinking she would be sniffing the cans) she used about 6 0r 8 in the week. She started getting sicker. lost most of her hair, lost her sight in one eye, then about 70% in the other eye. she was by now in a wheelchair. Then just after her 25th birthday the Consulant told us she had 3 to 6 weeks to live. We were devasted . it was only about 8 days before she died that i found out she was inhaling the cans. What she used to do was wrap the tin in a towel put it up to her mouth . I could not believe it. After she died i blamed myself terrible about buying all the cans and not realizing what she was doing. How she covered it up from everyone,Doctors,Nurses,District nurses, the Consultant etc.. and everyone. It was the boyfriend that got her hooked , it was only afterwards i was told the sort of guy he was smokin drugs and everything down in the room.i could kill him with my bare hands. the reason i am telling this is for everyone to know what this can do to a person. PLEASE PLEASE read my story and take it all in because nobody wants to lose a daughter at the age of 25 Thanks P. i am sorry much as i would like to stay in touch i am the worst person in the world for replyng to things just send me someything once in awhile thats the best i can do

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  19. Anonymous

    I’m asking where can I get help I inhale gas an want to stop but I always find myself getting more without thinking an I have mood swings and it’s beginning to worry me I see things and I do try stop but it’s so hard and if I stopped would my health improve back to how I was before I started doing this

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    • Dear Anonymous,

      It’s great that you are trying to get help.

      Stopping will improve your health. How much it will improve depends on how much damage you’ve done so far.

      Where to get help depends on where you live. If you have a personal physician, he or she can help point you to a local resource. Some drug treatment centers may be able to help.

      Don’t give up. Get the help you need!
      @MsGreene

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  20. Corona

    My sister inhales hairspray. I’ve talked to her about it, but she keeps doing it and now she talks to herself. She gets angry for everything. How can I get her help?

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    • Corona,

      Have you talked to your parents about this? Although you might be afraid to betray your sister’s trust, she will thank you for it later. She needs expert help to stop these destructive habits.

      @MsGreene

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  21. Shauna

    I have been doing this for a while now since I was about ten and I’m 13 now I actually did it last night nothing happened to me but I am starting to have breathing problems and pains in my chest can any 1 help get them pains away thank you

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    • Doreen

      Shauna. Last week a day before Mother’s Day a neighborhood boy 15 years old died from doing what you said. I cannot begin to tell you how devastating this has been for his parents and brother. He was a smart living happy kid, but did something that I’m sure he didn’t think would kill him. I’m sure if he knew the pain he has caused his family he would take it back. But it’s too late for him the damage is done and everyone has died inside. We miss him terribly cannot stop crying. If I could show you pictures and videos of him to see that he was a normal kid that just did something stupid you would never do it again. His name is Luke Bautista from Wall, NJ. Look it up. Please for the love of God.

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    • Lauren

      I’m 13 aswell and I’m getting pains right now I’m getting angry at everything and my breathing is really bad, it’s really bad for u and u need to stop i stopped 2-3 days ago I know it’s not long but I’m trying and I really understand it’s addictive because you like the buzz you like how it’s feels I know the feeling but you need to stop now as ur kidney can fail aswell I’ve really realised how bad this is now I’m realising it all

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    • Lauren

      Shauna,
      I know the feeling I’m 13 aswell and I stared I think I was coming 12 yes my mum caught me long ago and she started hiding the deodorant from me and she tried to get me help but I forced her not to because I was ashamed! It’s not nice for a girl doing this it’s dirty it ruins u, I’ve been feeling depressed and I get pains to! I’ve been of this for 2-3 days it’s not long but I’m trying! I know the buzz it’s nice and it’s very addictive but when I was doing it one time with my fiend I realised it just takes time if u read some of the people’s story’s on this you will realise what it does!! Please get back to me and tell me how ur doing xo

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      • Maddy

        Honestly, both of you really need to talk to people! I’m 14, and I also completely get what you’re talking about. But yes, I know that it’s really hard to talk about it, but it’s better that you tell someone first before someone else finds out. Because then they will start to lecture you about how you have no trust, bla bla blah. But even if you don’t want to tell your parents, please, please try your best to tell SOMEONE! As in the end, it’s either being dead, or being ashamed of what you did, but hopefully better, and also alive! Wishing you both the best of luck! :)

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  22. JustBeingHonest

    Don’t do it I did when I was 12 to 14 on and off with different aerosols deodorants when I felt depressed and so. But one night I did it and got high and started to hallucinate blood dripping down the walls and it felt like my face was falling off for like 10 mins. I know it’s common for people to feel like their faces are falling off and it is the most scariest. thing ever. You get really bad headaches after use. It’s not for worth the damage I know it is extremely addictive but seriously it will stuff your brain up if you continue. I am now seventeen and don’t do it anymore.

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    • Shauna

      These last couple of time I’ve been hearing and seeing things I’ve never seen before when I done it

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      • You need to get help from a doctor. I know it’s really hard to admit what’s been going on, but what you’re experiencing will only get worse unless you talk to a doctor and get help. The doctor does not have to tell your parents what’s going on. He or she can help you without them knowing — but if you can, it’s great for you to tell your parents yourself.

        This is serious.

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      • Lauren

        I’ve been coming of it waking up sweating every night and having dreams about it I’m getting headaches my legs hurt, my back hurts and my stomach and I don’t really feel like eating I don’t know what’s wrong with mešŸ˜“

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  23. Joshua

    Hi I have just inhaled Lynx 4 to 5 times today. I am really scared and I am restricting myself to never doing it again. I am 13 years old, when your friends start doing it it doesn’t mean you do it, think before you start.

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    • Lauren

      Joshua,
      I am 13 years old aswell and I know the buzz it’s so addictive and it’s nice but u need too think because this can really damage u! I know the feeling if ur friends really care about u WHY WOULD THEY GIVE YOU SOMETHING TO MAKE YOU DIE!! Joshua please you need to stop get back to me and let me know :)

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  24. Taliah

    I had a sleepover with my friends last night and they were all inhaling through a t shirt some rexona, I wasn’t aware of what they were even doing but did it anyway because otherwise I would be pussy. I went through The high and now the next day I keep thinking about doing it again. How can I stop myself?

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  25. Someone's sister

    Dear all,

    I’m from Belgium and have a troublesome worry. My 19-year old brother fulfills all the charachteristics of people who do this so called “huffing”. He isn’t going to school anymore, drinks himself almost every weekend into dangerous situations, and is occasionally on different kinds of drugs, harddrugs as well. We’ve tried to take him to a psychotherapist to find out what the concerns are, what he feels and so on… But he wasn’t open to this. I see my brothers behaviour getting worse every week, and I see how my mum is desperate. To conclude this, I would really be thankful, if someone could help me by saying to which kind of specialist we can take him to. He hates authority, disrespects doctors, policemen, schoolteachers, familly,… everyone who says anything to help him is confronted with my brothers agressive behaviour. He puts no importance in these societal structures. So intuitively, I feel this has gone way to far to simply have a conversation with him, as we’re doing this since some time now. Please, I’d need options of certain institutions, or concepts, where my brother could have the opportunity to work on every aspect of him. Just like a closed institution where he needs to be rebooted let’s say, to get some sense into him. It may sound un-sisterlike, I understand, but my brother doesn’t function well in society now. At the age of 19 it frightens us.
    Thank you very much for sharing all your brave stories, and thank you for reading my post, I’d be grateful for people who could reach out with suggestions to this issue.

    All the best and bless you all,
    A very worried sister,

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  26. Polly

    I have known nothing about huffing until recently. Read your statistic for returning to this abuse if not in a long term recovery program-hit me like a lead weight. We have a loved one who we have discovered returning to this lifestyle. In complete denial. Started as a teen, got some counseling but doubt it to be a long term recovery program. Is there anything we can do to help this person realize the destruction that is happening to the health and wellbeing – the self destructive path being followed? Not to mention the destruction of relationships it has caused as abandonment of family, friends and husband has recently unfolded. Anything?

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  27. Danielle

    I’m now almost 22 and I started sniffing cans of deodorant when I was around 10/11 through peer pressure of friends doing it. Safe to say I was hooked from the get go, ended up at the worst sniffing anything I could get my hands on, even 20-30 cans of deodorant a day by the time I was 14. My family would hide anything sniffable (didn’t work I’d always find it).

    I haven’t touched any in around a year now and because of how much I used to sniff I now have kidney damage, get kidney infections, etc. Not much that can be done because once you damage yourself, you’re damaged! Safe to say relapse happens, even I relapse well haven’t in a year, but I know at some point I probably will!

    You cannot hide it from your child, you have to talk to them about the reasons why they are doing it! They aren’t doing it for fun, heroin users don’t inject themselves because it’s fun. There’s an underling issue that you need to find out. It’s highly addictive and highly dangerous. All I can say is never be ashamed to go to your gp for help. That is how I actually stopped — had to go to drug addiction meetings and was classed as an addict, but it really does help.

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  28. Nobody Important

    Way back when I was 15 I began huffing, I’d trip out ant I thought it was the wildest rush there was, it continued for years. My behavior was abnormal, I did things that were horrible, and most of the time I had no clue as to what I was doing, sometimes I thought it was just the trip I was on at the time. I’m now 54 and I have heart problems. I stopped that foolishness many years ago and I’ve never gone back to doing it. Watch for the signs, it’s not funny when the kid is acting weird at any time of day or night. Sniffing their breath to see if they’ve been drinking isn’t the answer. Get them checked and keep an eye on them. I guess in a way I was lucky I somehow survived and here I am today trying to warn parents of a danger.

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  29. sharon

    Adults are not immune to huffing. It is an inexpensive high. It is a danger. Everyone, children and adults alike should be educated. I believe we should find an alternative to the substances that make this horrendous activity impossible.

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    • MrChilled

      There is an alternative, Weed lol Just give someone hooked on huffing some nice herb as a sub

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      • John

        Yes give them more paranoia and mood swings and 3000 chemicals

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        • Jackal

          Hey, at least nobody has ever died from their first toke! Growing brains really shouldn’t use any drugs unless they absolutely have to, like they can’t settle down to do *anything* without their ADHD meds, but harm reduction is a thing.

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  30. Leon dankwory

    Hey I’ve been inhaling solvents since the age of about 12-13 I’m now 26 and although I stopped for about 3 yes I have started again. I dint know what to do I fear it’s badly affecting my health but feel embarrassed and ashamed do don’t feel I can go to Dr’s also I’ve been led to believe adult addiction is uncommon which makes me even more reluctant to speak out. At my worst I would inhale up to 20 cans of deodorant a day! Having to shoplift to feed my habit. Now I’m inhaling about 1-2 cans a day and inhaling lighter gas refill I desperately need advice.

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    • Aidan

      Hey Leon. I hope your doing well these days. I’m not a medical expert or anything, I do really hope you keep working on getting clean. I’m sure there are many people in your life that want you to and I want you to live as well. Dr. Greene said right in the article to look at doing a program or rehab, if you can do this that would be great. Whatever you do end up doing, I hope you reach out and get the help you need.

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    • saul

      So what happened because I breathed in a can of spray deodorant and I’m not feeling anything yet. I’m 12 yrs of age by the way. And my biggest fear is death. I’m afraid what might happen to me, even though it was really quick about 1 quick second.

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  31. Eden Renata

    Hi. My name is Eden and I am 14 years old. I have been inhaling aerosols for the past 3 1/2 months on and off.

    Before all of this, in 2014, I had been going through depression and smoking and also self harm. I was told by a group of friends to try inhaling Rexona with a tea towel. Of course like most teenagers, I tried it and I can’t stop. My parents found out I was doing it and I was told to stop, but I can’t.

    I am afraid I am taking my life without knowing it.

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    • diane

      Eden. Please get help darling. Brake the cycle of addiction now. Tell your mum to take you to see the doctor tell the truth if you ate feeling low tell him. My son was like you , but he hide his problems and he died from solvent abuse on new years day. It won’t get better until you make people aware you need help . please do this for yourself and for my son Ben. Mum x

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  32. Guest

    ……

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