What Do We Do now?

What Do We Do Now

Now that you’ve got a picture you are happy with what are you going to do with it? Many are tempted to improve the picture through photo manipulating software. There are wonderful programs out there, but a word of caution to those just starting to learn the programs. Less is usually more.

There is a fine balance with cropping. You don’t want a lot of excess in the picture with no purpose, at the same time, you don’t want to cut out an important part of the picture. If you are not going to have full body shots try to not crop the picture where a joint is. Cropping at joints gives the picture an awkward look.

Where the main subject is on picture impacts the visual interest. I often refer to the rule of thirds. If you put an imaginary tic-tac-toe grid over your image the most important parts of the picture should fall on one of lines. For a headshot the most important part of the face is the eyes. BetterPhoto.com has some wonderful examples with an overlaid grid.

What use to be left to dark rooms has been brought into many homes with digital files and home printers. Home printers are acceptable for some projects; however when I want archival quality, large prints, or several prints at once I use a professional printer. When you decide on a printing method, whether home or professional I suggest printing a single copy to make sure you are happy with the quality of work before having them print bulk copies to send to friends and relatives. This is easier if you use a local printer that you can pick up the pictures in the store instead of having them mailed to you.

Heather

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Photography has helped provide balance for Heather through the stress of managing a family and earning her RN-BSN degree. Heather’s passion for photography lies in documenting life events.

 

Note: This Perspectives Blog post is written by a Guest Blogger of DrGreene.com and is provided in order to offer a variety of thoughtful points of view. The opinions expressed on this Perspectives Blog post do not reflect the opinions of Dr. Greene or DrGreene.com. As such, Dr. Greene and DrGreene.com are not responsible for the accuracy of the information supplied. This post is used under Creative Commons License CC BY-ND 3.0

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