Small is Beautiful

Small is Beautiful

Small is Beautiful

“In short, I am convinced, both by faith and experience, that to maintain one’s self on this earth is not a hardship but a pastime, if we will live simply and wisely.” – Henry David Thoreau

“Infinite growth of material consumption in a finite world is an impossibility.” – EF Schumacher

When the economist E. F. Schumacher published ‘Small is Beautiful’ in 1973 he was working with the premise that sustainable economies are possible. Schumacher believed in an economy of enough, an economy which supports social and natural systems in a sustainable way. Many economists and political theorists since have supported his notion that the economy must benefit people and the environment rather than degrade it. The Italian writer, activist and ‘Good Clean and Fair’ advocate Carlo Petrini is chief among them. Carlo Petrini has proposed that small and slow economies help us eat better food, have better health, create stronger communities and live better lives.

Visit the EF Schumacher Society and Slow Food International to learn more about the philosophy and work of these two visionaries.

The best way to support the slow economy is to start in your own home and community. Economy and ecology share the same greek root oikos which means home or community. Focusing energy on the local community and economy can help to create a more sustainable future worldwide. Go to the yard sales and markets, get to know the farmers and craft-workers in your village. It is possible to get the things you want from a local crafts-person just look around and see what you find. Global artisan networks like the Women’s Global Artisan Network and Ten Thousand Villages can help you research local connections.

Cory Whitney

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Cory Whitney is a young hopeful in the world of alternative agriculture, with a unique community based education in Natural Resources Management and Human Ecology stressing community, peace, sustainability and responsibility.

 

Note: This Perspectives Blog post is written by a Guest Blogger of DrGreene.com and is provided in order to offer a variety of thoughtful points of view. The opinions expressed on this Perspectives Blog post do not reflect the opinions of Dr. Greene or DrGreene.com. As such, Dr. Greene and DrGreene.com are not responsible for the accuracy of the information supplied. This post is used under Creative Commons License CC BY-ND 3.0

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