Moms, Aunts and Grandmas are Picking up the Phone

picking up the phone

Today thousands of people are coming together to make a call. They won’t be calling their partner, doctor or friends. They’re calling Congress.

If you just rolled your eyes at the thought of calling Congress, stay with me for a minute, this will be fun. I promise.

I work with people, perhaps just like you, from all over the country that are concerned about unregulated toxic chemicals ending up in our homes, products, children’s bodies, and the places we work and live.

Most of the grassroots members of Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families don’t consider themselves “political” and yet they are calling Congress for today’s National Day of Action — together we’re sending a clear message to our federal leaders:

We’re tired of toxic chemicals getting a free pass and it’s time to for real, meaningful regulations on toxic chemicals.

Our coalition has been sounding the alarm about a bill before the Senate, the Chemical Safety Improvement Act.

As it’s drafted, it doesn’t adequately protect pregnant women, children and communities with industrial pollution. We want reform, but it has to be credible and it must protect public health from toxic chemicals.

Why toxic chemicals are unregulated

Back in the 1970s when Congress was passing major environmental legislation, they passed a little known bill called the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), which was intended to regulate toxic chemicals and substances in industrial facilities, manufacturing and most consumer products.

Unfortunately this law is the only environmental law from the 1970s never to be updated and is seriously broken.

You can imagine all that we’ve learned about chemicals in the last 40 years: we use to think that the “dose makes the poison,” research from the last few decades however shows that there are certain classes of chemicals that have negative impacts at lower doses.

Hormone disrupting chemicals are one class of chemicals that behave in such a way and are commonly found in children’s products, vinyl flooring, school supplies, cosmetics and fragrances.

The worse part is that TSCA, our current law, does very little (some say nothing) to protect the public and environment from toxic chemicals. The Environmental Protection Agency is hamstrung and is unable to regulate toxic chemicals.

Our law is so weak, the EPA couldn’t even regulate asbestos.

For most people it’s alarming to learn that chemicals are virtually unregulated in the United States. And it drives us to take action.

We deserve better. Our children, nieces and nephews deserve better.

Call Congress today and tell them you want REAL reform of our toxic chemical laws.

To take action click here, or if you’re reading this on your phone call the Capitol switchboard to be directly connected to your Senators.

Capitol switchboard: 1-888-907-6886

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Lindsay Dahl

Lindsay Dahl is the Deputy Director of Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families – a national coalition working to put common sense limits on toxic chemicals to protect public health from the unnecessary exposure. Dahl is a grassroots organizer, blogger, and coalition builder.

Note: This Perspectives Blog post is written by a guest blogger of DrGreene.com. The opinions expressed on this post do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Dr. Greene or DrGreene.com, and as such we are not responsible for the accuracy of the information supplied. View the license for this post.

  1. Thank you for discussing the fear that many people have of making these phone calls. Even with a background in activism I find myself often hesitating to call elected officials. Even though I know that phone calls and personal letters are significantly more effective van all of these online petitions we see.

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