Let’s Start a National Conversation about Protecting Kids from Pesticides

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Let’s Start a National Conversation about Protecting Kids from Pesticides

It’s a fact. Kids today are sicker than they were a generation ago, and pesticides are part of the reason why.

From childhood cancers to birth defects and asthma, a startling array of childhood diseases and disorders are on the rise. Public health experts tell us we have a “silent pandemic” of learning disabilities and disorders, with one of every 6 children affected.

Concerned parents can make smart choices at home that do make a difference, but we can’t protect kids from pesticides one household at a time. It’s time we name and tackle this problem by building a national conversation — from the ground up.

Do one thing.

Nobody can do everything, but everybody can choose one thing and do it. Whether it’s writing a letter or check, making a phone call, or being a conscientious consumer — we each have real power. That power builds when we act together, and it starts when one person does one thing.

Pledge to be a kids’ health conversation starter in your community! Write letters to your local paper, activate people in your network — whatever your starting point, the folks at Pesticide Action Network have created some tools to help.

After signing the pledge, you’ll find a 2-page discussion guide with facts and figures from PAN’s latest report outlining the state of the science on pesticides and children’s health, A Generation in Jeopardy. Take it out in the world, and start the conversation.

Kristin Schafer

Article written by

Kristin Schafer, M.A. is a Senior Policy Strategist at Pesticide Action Network (PAN) and the Lead Author on several PAN reports. Her work focuses on the intersection of pesticides, children’s health, and policy issues. She writes often on the topic for PAN’s GroundTruth blog.

 

Note: This Perspectives Blog post is written by a Guest Blogger of DrGreene.com and is provided in order to offer a variety of thoughtful points of view. The opinions expressed on this Perspectives Blog post do not reflect the opinions of Dr. Greene or DrGreene.com. As such, Dr. Greene and DrGreene.com are not responsible for the accuracy of the information supplied. This post is used under Creative Commons License CC BY-ND 3.0

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