How to Have a Better VBAC – Part 2

How to Have a Better VBAC – Part 2

How to Have a Better VBAC – Part 2

Get Yourself a Doula.

Trained labor support is worth its weight in gold, especially through a VBAC.  If your previous birth ended in a cesarean after a long, hard labor – or, if you never got to labor at all – you may need an experienced support person present through your VBAC to help keep you strong, and to help you understand what’s normal. 

My recommendations for finding a doula that’s right for you:

And on the topic of support people – make sure the people you are allowing into your birth space are wholly supportive of your needs, and understanding of your desire to have a VBAC.  When dealing with family or friends who may not support your choice, keep the discussion about your birth to a minimum.  Provide them with good information about VBAC during your pregnancy if they’re interested, but keep in mind their opinions have no place in your birth.  It is your body, your baby. Do what is right for you, and ignore any negativity.

If you need more support — join your local ICAN chapter, and/or get on the national listserve.

Finally, relax.

Now that you have prepared yourself to have a better VBAC, that is probably exactly what you’ll have.  Visualize your beautiful birth.  Will your beautiful birth into existence.  Even if life throws you a curve ball, or if your baby does truly need to be born by cesarean for some reason, the steps you have taken to empower yourself can help the experience remain as satisfying, beautiful, and safe as possible.

What did you do to prepare yourself, and/or your family, for a Vaginal Birth After Cesarean?

Gina Crosley-Corcoran

Article written by

Gina Crosley-Corcoran is a mother of two young sons, pre-law student at Loyola University, and empowered-parenting activist. You can read Gina's ongoing blog at The Feminist Breeder.

 

Note: This Perspectives Blog post is written by a Guest Blogger of DrGreene.com and is provided in order to offer a variety of thoughtful points of view. The opinions expressed on this Perspectives Blog post do not reflect the opinions of Dr. Greene or DrGreene.com. As such, Dr. Greene and DrGreene.com are not responsible for the accuracy of the information supplied. This post is used under Creative Commons License CC BY-ND 3.0

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