High-Protein Desserts

High-Protein Desserts

Oh, the glories of summer tomatoes, corn, peppers, and berries! Sometimes, I just want to eat a big salad for dinner. That’s where high-protein desserts like today’s recipe for Blueberry Clafoutis come in handy. It’s a great way to get your family to eat fruit and eggs. We have it for dinner one night and then for breakfast the next day.

High-protein desserts.

How much protein does the average adult need?  Nutritionist Jane Brody says 36 grams of protein a day if your ideal weight is 100 pounds, 54 grams if it’s 150, and 72 grams if it’s 200 pounds. Ironically, too much protein can actually lead to osteoporosis and other problems. So you don’t need to eat a Triple Patty MacWhopper twice a day (or ever) to get your protein. But some cookbooks take too casual an approach to getting enough. True, even apples contain protein, but in developing the Cook for Good menu, I found  it easy to drift below my goal of 50 to 60 grams a day.

To the rescue: high-protein desserts. Have a big salad or bowl of gazpacho for dinner, then top it off with a dessert that includes nuts, eggs, milk, yogurt, or even high-protein grains like couscous.

This is my last day as a guest blogger here at DrGreene.com, so I can’t give you a preview of tomorrow’s recipe. But it’s been great fun! If you enjoyed my recipes and tips, please sign up for the free weekly newsletter on CookforGood.com. It will help you save money, eat well, and make a difference!

Today, tell us about your favorite high-protein recipes in the comments section below. What’s your go-to treat after a big salad?

Go to Blueberry Clafoutis Recipe

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Linda Watson

Linda Watson started the Cook for Good project after becoming obsessed with the national Food Stamp Challenge: living on a dollar a meal per person for a week. Her three-week experiment became a lifestyle, the website CookforGood.com, the book Wildly Affordable Organic, and now the Wildly Good Cook videos and teachers' training program. She teaches cooking classes and gives talks on thrift, sustainability, and food justice across the country. You can get more from Linda on Facebook..

Note: This Perspectives Blog post is written by a guest blogger of DrGreene.com. The opinions expressed on this post do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Dr. Greene or DrGreene.com, and as such we are not responsible for the accuracy of the information supplied. View the license for this post.