Finding the good in ADHD, Part 5: Sensivity

Finding the good in ADHD, Part 5: Sensivity

Finding the good in ADHD, Part 5: Sensivity

[Sen-si-tiv-i-ty, adj. easily offended, embarrassed, and angered; hurt feelings from tone of voice; cares about others.]

I’m 6’4” tall and weigh 250 pounds. I’m an amateur boxer. I lift weights. Oh, did I tell you that I’m also a sensitive guy? Yeah, you heard right; sensitive. Being sensitive can have a downside and an upside. On the downside, sensitivity can cause an ADHDer to wear their emotions on their sleeve. We’re often easily hurt and offended when people confront us, even if they do so in a kind way. We tend to read into situations much more than we need to and our tendency is to assume the worst. When we’re upset, our ADHD mind can blow situations out of proportion and create that uncontrollable titan of hurt feelings, a.k.a. “The Incredible Sulk”.

On the upside, people with ADHD have tender hearts and are usually kind and generous to their peers, especially when they recognize that the other person is hurting. Because ADHD children are acutely aware of their surroundings, even when it doesn’t seem that way at all, their gift of compassion will tune them into other children and even adults who needs some love. They may need some guidance on appropriate ways to “give some love” and also be sure to praise them for their caring heart. It will be a great encouragement to them and should pay off dividends for you as well.

Ben Glenn

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While in grade school, Ben Glenn was diagnosed with dyslexia, but wasn't diagnosed with ADHD until he was an adult. He is the author of the upcoming release, “Simple Answers to Commonly Asked Questions About ADHD,” in addition to “Simply Special, Learning to Love Your ADHD” and a three-part guidebook series developed for parents and teachers.

 

Note: This Perspectives Blog post is written by a Guest Blogger of DrGreene.com and is provided in order to offer a variety of thoughtful points of view. The opinions expressed on this Perspectives Blog post do not reflect the opinions of Dr. Greene or DrGreene.com. As such, Dr. Greene and DrGreene.com are not responsible for the accuracy of the information supplied. This post is used under Creative Commons License CC BY-ND 3.0

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