Dark Chocolate (Cacao) is not from Belgium or Switzerland.

Dark Chocolate (Cacao) is not from Belgium or Switzerland.

Dark Chocolate (Cacao) is not from Belgium or Switzerland.

Everyone should know the origin of their food.  Although eating local is encouraged, in the case of cacao, eating local probably won’t be possible for you.  Cacao is grown + or – 20 degrees of the equator and comes from a fruit.

http://www.sweetriot.com/cacaofun/cacao_map.php

Yes it’s true – Dark chocolate really comes from fruit – the cacao fruit grown on the cacao tree.

Long long ago, far far away, deep in the jungles of Central America and all within 10 degrees either side of the equator, cacao was being used by the Mayans, Olmecs, and Aztecs as a ritualistic and indulgent beverage. This South American concoction was seen as possessing aphrodisiac and revitalizing powers. A cold, foamy mixture of cacao paste and water was coveted and revered while the actual beans were so precious they were used as money.  Did you know that in ancient times one large tomato was equivalent to a single cacao bean?  For more cacao currency fun facts check out the link below.

http://www.sweetriot.com/cacaofun/cacao_exchange.php

Moral of the story – eat the most amazing fruit on earth – chocolate!

 

Sarah Endline

Article written by

Sarah is an advocate of socially responsible business and cacao and has spoken at elite conferences and events around the world including Harvard Business School, Whole Foods, the University of Michigan, Net Impact, The Leadership Gathering, AIESEC, the South by Southwest Interactive Festival, and the GEL Design Conference.

 

Note: This Perspectives Blog post is written by a Guest Blogger of DrGreene.com and is provided in order to offer a variety of thoughtful points of view. The opinions expressed on this Perspectives Blog post do not reflect the opinions of Dr. Greene or DrGreene.com. As such, Dr. Greene and DrGreene.com are not responsible for the accuracy of the information supplied. This post is used under Creative Commons License CC BY-ND 3.0

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