Eating for Two: A Guide to Mother’s Nutrition during Pregnancy – Part 7 – Niacin, Riboflavin, Thiamin, Pantothenic Acid, & Omega

Eating for Two: A Guide to Mother’s Nutrition during Pregnancy - Part 7 - Niacin, Riboflavin, Thiamin, Pantothenic Acid, & Omega

Eating for Two: A Guide to Mother’s Nutrition during Pregnancy - Part 7 - Niacin, Riboflavin, Thiamin, Pantothenic Acid, & Omega

Niacin, Riboflavin, Thiamin, Pantothenic Acid, and Omega-3 Fatty Acids

These are the only remaining nutrients of which we know women need to increase their proportional intake during pregnancy. Pregnant women are designed to eat diets richer in these nutrients. Like all of the nutrients we have covered so far in this chapter, niacin, riboflavin, thiamine, pantothenic acid and omega-3 fatty acids all need to become bigger parts of the bigger pregnancy diet. Total amounts of other nutrients, such as fiber, selenium, vitamin A, and vitamin C, also need to increase slightly during pregnancy – but not as much as overall calories do.

The words “niacin, riboflavin, thiamin, and pantothenic acid” may make the eyes glaze, or they may sound familiar from the side panel of a cereal box or a package of bread. Because they are so widely supplemented, deficiency is unlikely. They are all coenzymes active in a variety of metabolic processes in both moms and babies.

Niacin occurs naturally in whole grains, legumes, and nuts, as well as in meat, fish, and poultry. Riboflavin shows up in whole grains, as well as in milk, meats, and (again) liver. Thiamin is found predominately in whole grains, but also richly in pork. Pantothenic acid is widely dispersed in whole grains, yeast, potatoes, tomatoes, eggs, broccoli, chicken, beef, and (care to guess?) liver.

These vitamins are all contained in prenatal supplements – unlike the final two nutrients on this list.

Read More from: Eating for Two: A Guide to Mother’s Nutrition during Pregnancy

Eating for Two: Part 1 – Pregnancy A Special Time
Eating for Two: Part 2 – Folate and Iron
Eating for Two: Part 3 – How Much Folate Do You Need?
Eating for Two: Part 4 – The Gift of Iron
Eating for Two: Part 5 – Vitamin B6 and Iodine
Eating for Two Part 6 – Zinc
Eating for Two: Part 7 – Niacin, Riboflavin, Thiamin, Pantothenic Acid, and Omega-3
Eating for Two: Part 8 – Not Found in Most Prenatal Vitamins!
Eating for Two: Part 9 – Calcium!?
Eating for Two: Part 10 – Calories
Eating for Two: Part 11 – Liver
Eating for Two: Part 12 – Chocolate
Eating for Two: Part 13 – Eating for the Future

Dr. Alan Greene

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Dr. Greene is the founder of DrGreene.com (cited by the AMA as “the pioneer physician Web site”), a practicing pediatrician, father of four, & author of Raising Baby Green & Feeding Baby Green. He appears frequently in the media including such venues as the The New York Times, the TODAY Show, Good Morning America, & the Dr. Oz Show.

 

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