Facts Related Articles & Blog Posts

  • Fast Facts about Pertussis

    Fast Facts about Pertussis

    Pertussis is commonly known as whooping cough. Pertussis is caused by bacteria that attach themselves to the cilia (little hairs) that line the respiratory tract. These bacteria produce a potent toxin that inflames the respiratory tract and that prevents the cilia from functioning properly.

    Read full story
  • Fast Facts about Meningitis

    Fast Facts about Meningitis

    Bacterial meningitis can occur at any age, but 95 percent of cases are in children under 5 years old. Boys are more likely to get it than girls.

    Read full story
  • Fast Facts about Childhood Migraines

    Fast Facts about Childhood Migraines

    Migraines are the most important and frequent type of headache in children, affecting more than one in twelve kids — yet only 20 percent of children with migraines are ever properly diagnosed and treated (Headache, May 1997).

    Read full story
  • Fast Facts about Trisomy 13

    Fast Facts about Trisomy 13

    Trisomy 13 (also called Patau Syndrome) occurs in up to 1 out of 5,000 newborns (Smith’s Recognizable Patterns of Human Malformation, Saunders 1988).

    Read full story
  • Fast Facts about Sun and our Eyes

    Fast Facts about Sun and our Eyes

    One of the great wonders of the human body is the ability of damaged cells to be repaired or replaced. Red blood cells, for instance, live for about 120 days. Each day, about 1% of your red blood cells retire to be replaced by a fresh generation. The lens of the eye is a notable […]

    Read full story
  • Fast Facts about Febrile Seizures

    Fast Facts about Febrile Seizures

    Some children have seizures or convulsions when they have fevers. Febrile seizures occur in 3% to 5% of otherwise healthy children between the ages of 6 months and 5 years. Toddlers are the most commonly affected.

    Read full story
  • Fast Facts about Fevers

    Fast Facts about Fevers

    Most bacteria and viruses that cause infections in humans thrive best at 98.6 degrees F (37C). Raising the temperature a few degrees can give the body the winning edge. In addition, a fever activates the body’s immune system, accelerating the production of white blood cells, antibodies, and many other infection-fighting agents.

    Read full story
  • Fast Facts about the DTaP Vaccine

    Fast Facts about the DTaP Vaccine

    The DTaP vaccine is a newer version of the older DPT vaccine. DTaP is designed to immunize against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis.

    Read full story
  • Fast Facts about Group A Strep

    Fast Facts about Group A Strep

    More than 100 different types of Group A Beta Strep have been identified.

    Read full story
  • Fast Facts about Septra

    Fast Facts about Septra

    Septra and Bactrim are both brand names for a combination antibiotic called trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.

    Read full story