Guest Blogger

Dan Imler MD

Dan Imler MD

Dan Imler, MD is a pediatric hospitalist at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford University. Not only does he enjoy taking care of patients, but is actively involved in resident education, international health and medical informatics. During his residency training he worked with Dr. Greene and has remained a close colleague and friend since.

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Blog Posts by Dan Imler MD

  • What’s got me excited now?

    What’s got me excited now?

    One of the beauties of being a physician is that not only does your world encompasses the clinical aspects of health, but also involves many other disciplines as well. Often people assume that a doctor’s influence ends at the clinic or hospital door, however that is far from the truth.

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  • What Medicine Will Be like in 10 Years

    What medicine will be like in 10-20 years

    This is a question that I’m often asked when talking to future physicians or people in general. Medicine has gone through some impressive, dynamic changes in the last ten to twenty years, even more since I started down this road.

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  • Things to ask yourself prior to starting a career in medicine

    Things to ask yourself prior to starting a career in medicine

    When people have asked me what it takes to be a physician, I usually tell them that there are three things that every doctor must have. And no, being scared of blood is not a deal breaker.

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  • How I got here

    How I got here

    Every doctor has a story of how they ended up in medicine. Mine goes like this. My parents instilled two things that looking back now were probably the reason I was drawn to become a physician. From my father I inherited the love of problem solving.

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  • What it's like to be a pediatric hospitalist

    What it’s like to be a pediatric hospitalist

    First of all you might be wondering what a pediatric hospitalist does. Prior to about 10 years ago, when a child became ill enough to require hospital admission, their pediatrician would place them in a hospital and then manage their inpatient care accordingly.

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