Clubfoot: A-to-Z Guide from Diagnosis to Treatment to Prevention

Clubfoot

Related concepts:

Talipes equinovarus

Introduction to clubfoot:

What do Olympic gold medalist figure skater Kristi Yamaguchi, Super Bowl Champion All-Pro quarterback Troy Aikman, actor-writer-musician-composer Dudley Moore, Hall of Fame sports announcer Pat Sumerall, romantic poet Lord Byron, comedian-actor-writer-director Damon Wayans, British King Richard III, Heisman trophy winner Charles Woodson, and Olympic gold medalist pioneering women’s soccer star Mia Hamm all have in common?

You’ve already guessed. They were all born with clubfeet!

What is clubfoot?

Clubfoot is a deformity of the foot and lower calf. The bones, joints, muscles, and blood vessels of the limb are abnormal.

Who gets clubfoot?

Anyone can be born with clubfoot. It can run in families and is slightly more common in boys. Most children born with clubfoot have no other congenital problems, but sometimes clubfoot occurs in association with other abnormalities or syndromes.

What are the symptoms of clubfoot?

Although the name “clubfoot” sounds like a brutish Dickensian deformity, the actual appearance is that of a normal foot turned down and inwards. Without treatment, the child would walk on the outer edge of the foot. It is stiff and cannot be brought into normal position.

Is clubfoot contagious?

No

How long does clubfoot last?

Clubfoot does not improve with time. It lasts until treated.

How is clubfoot diagnosed?

The diagnosis is made by physical examination. X-rays are used to further evaluate clubfoot.

How is clubfoot treated?

Clubfoot is treated by an orthopedic surgeon. Taping, splints, and casts are often used. The foot is gently stretched closer to the correct position and then placed in a cast to hold it there. This procedure is repeated multiple times to bring the foot into the best position possible.

Surgical correction may be needed.

Treatment may take months or years.

How can clubfoot be prevented?

Prevention of clubfoot is usually not possible.

Related A-to-Z Information:

Anorectal Malformations (Imperforate anus), Arthritis (Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, JRA) , Cerebral Palsy, Cleft Lip and Palate, Congenital Hip Dislocation, Constipation, Early Puberty, Enuresis (Bed-wetting), Hernia (Inguinal hernia), Hydrocele, Hydrocephalus, Inconspicuous Penis, Meningitis, Muscular Dystrophy, Polio, Spina Bifida, Tibial Torsion (Turned-in feet), Torticollis, Undescended Testicle (Cryptorchidism)

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Dr. Alan Greene

Dr. Greene is the founder of DrGreene.com (cited by the AMA as “the pioneer physician Web site”), a practicing pediatrician, father of four, & author of Raising Baby Green & Feeding Baby Green. He appears frequently in the media including such venues as the The New York Times, the TODAY Show, Good Morning America, & the Dr. Oz Show.