Superficial thrombophlebitis

Alternative Names

Thrombophlebitis – superficial

Definition of Superficial thrombophlebitis

Superficial thrombophlebitis is inflammation of a vein due to a in a vein located just below the skin’s surface.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Superficial thrombophlebitis may occur after injury to the vein or the recent use of an intravenous (IV) line or catheter. It may also develop for no apparent reason in persons at risk for the condition.

Signs and tests

Your health care provider will diagnose superficial thrombophlebitis based mainly on the appearance of the affected area. Frequent checks of the pulse, , temperature, skin condition, and blood flow may be needed.

Treatment

The goals of treatment are to reduce pain and inflammation and prevent complications.

Expectations (prognosis)

Superficial thrombophlebitis is usually a short-term condition that does not lead to complication. Symptoms generally go away in 1 to 2 weeks, but hardness of the vein may remain for much longer.

Review

Linda Vorvick, MD, Seattle Site Coordinator, Lecturer, Pathophysiology, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Washington School of Medicine; and Emile Riggs Mohler III, MD, Vascular Medicine, Associate Professor of Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc. – 4/30/2010

Superficial thrombophlebitis
Superficial thrombophlebitis

ADAM Medical Encyclopedia

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