Solitary pulmonary nodule

Definition of Solitary pulmonary nodule

A solitary pulmonary nodule is a round or oval spot (lesion) in the lungs that is seen with a or .

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

More than half of all solitary pulmonary are noncancerous (benign). Benign nodules have many causes, including old scars and infections.

Symptoms

There are usually no symptoms.

Signs and tests

A solitary pulmonary nodule is usually found on a chest x-ray. If x-rays repeated over time show the nodule size has remain unchanged for 2 years, it is generally considered benign.

Treatment

Ask your doctor about the risks of a biopsy versus monitoring the size of the nodule with regular x-rays.

Expectations (prognosis)

The outlook is generally good if the nodule is benign. If the nodule does not grow larger over a 2-year period, under most circumstances nothing more need be done. On occasion, the appearance of the nodule on CT scan may warrant continued follow-up.

Review

Allen J. Blaivas, DO, Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine UMDNJ-NJMS, Attending Physician in the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, Department of Veteran Affairs, VA New Jersey Health Care System, East Orange, NJ. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc. – 8/17/2009

Adenocarcinoma - chest X-ray
Pulmonary nodule - front view chest X-ray
Pulmonary nodule, solitary - CT scan
Respiratory system

ADAM Medical Encyclopedia

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