Renovascular hypertension

Alternative Names

Renal hypertension; Hypertension – renovascular; Renal artery occlusion; Stenosis – renal artery

Definition of Renovascular hypertension

Renovascular hypertension is high blood pressure due to narrowing of the arteries that carry blood to the kidneys.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

When the arteries that carry blood to your kidneys become narrow, less blood flows to the kidneys. The kidneys mistakenly respond as if your blood pressure is low and give off hormones that tell the body to hold on to more salt and water. This causes your blood pressure to rise.

Symptoms

Usually, high blood pressure causes no symptoms. Occasionally you may have a mild headache. If your headache is severe, or if you have any of the symptoms below, see a doctor right away. These may be a sign of .

Signs and tests

People with renovascular hypertension usually have severe, difficult-to-control high blood pressure. They may have a history of high blood pressure that is hard to control or does not get better with medication.

Treatment

High blood pressure caused by narrowing of the arteries that lead to the kidneys (renovascular hypertension) is often difficult to control.

Review

Issam Mikati, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Director, Northwestern Clinic Echocardiography Lab, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc. – 5/22/2010

Hypertensive kidney

ADAM Medical Encyclopedia

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