Pyloric stenosis

Alternative Names

Congenital hypertrophic pyloric stenosis; Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis; Gastric outlet obstruction

Definition of Pyloric stenosis

Pyloric stenosis is a narrowing of the pylorus, the opening from the stomach into the small intestine.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Normally, food passes easily from the stomach into the duodenum (the first part of the small intestine) through a valve called the pylorus. In pyloric stenosis, the muscles of the pylorus are thickened. This thickening prevents the stomach from emptying into the small intestine.

Symptoms

Vomiting is the first symptom in most children:

Signs and tests

The condition is usually diagnosed before the baby is 6 months old.

Treatment

Treatment for pyloric stenosis involves surgery (called a pyloromyotomy) to split the overdeveloped muscles.

Expectations (prognosis)

Surgery usually provides complete relief of symptoms. The infant can usually tolerate small, frequent feedings several hours after surgery.

Review

Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc. – 8/2/2009

Pyloric stenosis
Pyloric stenosis - series

ADAM Medical Encyclopedia

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