Pierre Robin syndrome

Alternative Names

Robin sequence; Pierre Robin complex; Pierre Robin anomaly

Definition of Pierre Robin syndrome

Pierre Robin syndrome is a condition present at birth, in which the infant has a smaller than normal lower jaw, a tongue that falls back in the throat, and difficulty breathing.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

The exact causes of Pierre Robin syndrome are unknown. It may be part of many genetic syndromes.

Signs and tests

A health care provider can usually diagnose this condition during a physical exam. Consulting with a genetics specialist can rule out other problems linked to this syndrome.

Treatment

Infants with this condition should NOT be put on their back, to prevent the tongue from falling back into the airway.

Expectations (prognosis)

Choking and feeding problems may go away on their own over the first few years as the lower jaw grows to a more normal size. There is a significant risk of problems if the airways are not protected against blockage.

Review

Luc Jasmin, MD, PhD, Departments of Anatomy and Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, CA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc. – 10/14/2009

Infant hard and soft palates

ADAM Medical Encyclopedia

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