Pericarditis – after heart attack

Alternative Names

Dressler syndrome; Post-MI pericarditis; Post-cardiac injury syndrome; Postcardiotomy pericarditis

Definition of Pericarditis – after heart attack

Pericarditis is inflammation and swelling of the covering of the heart (pericardium). The condition can occur in the days or weeks following a heart attack.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Two types of pericarditis can occur after a heart attack.

Signs and tests

The health care provider will use a stethoscope to listen to your heart and lungs. There may be a rubbing sound (called a pericardial friction rub, not to be confused with a heart murmur). in general may be weak or sound far away.

Treatment

The goal of treatment is to make the heart work better and reduce pain and other symptoms.

Expectations (prognosis)

The condition may come back, even in people who receive treatment. In some cases, untreated pericarditis can be life threatening.

Review

David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, Unviersity of Washington School of Medicine; and Michael A. Chen, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, Washington. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc. – 7/10/2010

Acute MI
Post-MI pericarditis
Pericardium

ADAM Medical Encyclopedia

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