Optic glioma

Alternative Names

Glioma – optic; Optic nerve glioma

Definition of Optic glioma

Gliomas are tumors that grow in various parts of the brain. Optic gliomas can affect:

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Optic gliomas are rare. The cause of optic gliomas is unknown. Most optic gliomas are slow-growing and noncancerous (benign) and occur in children, almost always before age 20.

Symptoms

The symptoms are due to the tumor growing and pressing on the optic nerve and nearby structures. Symptoms may include:

Signs and tests

A neurologic examination reveals a loss of vision in one or both eyes. There may be changes in the optic nerve, including swelling or scarring of the nerve, or paleness and atrophy of the optic disc.

Treatment

Treatment varies with the size of the tumor and the general health of the person. The goal may be to cure the disorder, relieve symptoms, or improve vision and comfort.

Expectations (prognosis)

The outlook is highly variable. Early treatment improves the chance of a good outcome. Many tumors are curable with surgery, while others return.

Review

David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc., and Yi-Bin Chen, MD, Leukemia/Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Massachusetts General Hospital. – 3/2/2010

Neurofibromatosis I, enlarged optic foramen

ADAM Medical Encyclopedia

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