Multiple system atrophy

Alternative Names

Shy-Drager syndrome; Neurologic orthostatic hypotension; Shy-McGee-Drager syndrome; Parkinson’s plus syndrome; MSA-P; MSA-C

Definition of Multiple system atrophy

Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare condition that causes symptoms similar to . However, patients with MSA have more widespread damage to the part of the nervous system that controls important functions such as heart rate, blood pressure, and sweating.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

The cause is unknown. MSA develops gradually and is most often diagnosed in men older than 60.

Symptoms

MSA damages the nervous system, which can cause the following symptoms:

Signs and tests

The health care provider may perform the following:

Treatment

There is no cure for MSA, and there is no known way to prevent the disease from getting worse. The goal of treatment is to control symptoms.

Expectations (prognosis)

The outcome is poor. Loss of mental and physical functions slowly get worse. . Early death is likely. The typical survival time from the time of diagnosis is 7 to 9 years.

Review

Kevin Sheth, MD, Department of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc. – 11/22/2010

Central nervous system

ADAM Medical Encyclopedia

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