Multiple lentigines syndrome

Alternative Names

Leopard syndrome

Definition of Multiple lentigines syndrome

Multiple lentigines syndrome is an inherited disorder identified by an increased number of lentigines (freckle-like spots).

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Multiple lentigines syndrome is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. People with this condition have large numbers of lentigines. Lentigines are skin markings that are somewhat darker than true freckles. They are present from birth. They are located mostly on the trunk and neck.

Signs and tests

A physical examination may show signs of mild pulmonic stenosis (obstruction of the pulmonic heart valve) and obstructive .

Treatment

The goal of treatment is to help with the correctable problems. The degree of must be determined and hearing aids supplied where necessary. Hormone treatment may be necessary at the expected time of puberty to cause the normal changes to occur.

Expectations (prognosis)

Most patients adjust very well with proper attention to their specific problems.

Review

Jonathan Kantor, MD, North Florida Dermatology Associates, Jacksonville, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc. – 4/15/2009

Pectus excavatum

ADAM Medical Encyclopedia

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