Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) II

Alternative Names

Sipple syndrome; MEN II

Definition of Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) II

Multiple endocrine neoplasia, type II (MEN II) is an inherited disorder in which one or more of the endocrine glands are overactive or form a tumor. Endocrine glands most commonly involved include:

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

The cause of MEN II is a defect in a gene called RET. This defect causes many tumors to appear in the same person, but not necessarily at the same time. The adrenal tumor is called a , and the thyroid tumor is a .

Symptoms

The symptoms may vary. However, they are similar to those of:

Signs and tests

To diagnose this condition, the health care provider looks for a mutation in the RET gene. This can be done with a blood test. Additional tests are done to determine which hormones are being overproduced.

Treatment

Surgery is needed to remove pheochromocytoma.

Expectations (prognosis)

Pheochromocytoma is usually not cancerous (benign). Medullary carcinoma of the thyroid is a very aggressive and potentially fatal cancer. However, early diagnosis and surgery can often lead to a cure.

Review

David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine; Yi-Bin Chen, MD, Leukemia/Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Massachusetts General Hospital. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc. – 3/2/2010

Endocrine glands

ADAM Medical Encyclopedia

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