Intraductal papilloma

Definition of Intraductal papilloma

Intraductal papilloma is a small, noncancerous (benign) that grows in a milk duct of the breast.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Intraductal papilloma occurs most often in women ages 35 – 55. The causes and risk factors are unknown.

Signs and tests

Intraductal papilloma is the most common cause of spontaneous nipple discharge from a single duct.

Treatment

The involved duct is surgically removed and the cells are checked for cancer ().

Expectations (prognosis)

The outcome is excellent for people with one tumor. People with many tumors, or who get them at an early age may have an increased risk of developing cancer, particularly if they have a family history of cancer or there are abnormal cells in the biopsy.

Review

Daniel N. Sacks, MD, FACOG. Obstetrics & Gynecology in Private Practice, West Palm Beach, FL. Review provided by Verimed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc. – 8/17/2009

Needle biopsy of the breast
Intraductal papilloma
Abnormal discharge from the nipple

ADAM Medical Encyclopedia

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