Familial hypertriglyceridemia

Definition of Familial hypertriglyceridemia

Familial hypertriglyceridemia is a common disorder passed down through families in which the level of triglycerides (a type of fat) in a person’s blood are higher than normal.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Familial hypertriglyceridemia is caused by a genetic defect, which is passed on in an autosomal dominant fashion. This means that if you get a bad copy of the gene from just one of your parents, you will have the condition.

Symptoms

You may not notice any symptoms. People with the condition may have coronary artery disease at an early age.

Signs and tests

People with a family history of this condition should have blood tests to check (VLDL) and triglyceride levels. Blood tests usually show a mild to moderate increase in triglycerides (about 200 to 500 mg/dL).

Treatment

The goal of treatment is to control conditions that can raise triglyceride levels such as , hypothyroidism, and diabetes.

Expectations (prognosis)

Persons with this condition have an increased risk of and pancreatitis.

Review

David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc., and David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine. – 5/23/2010

ADAM Medical Encyclopedia

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