Ewing’s sarcoma

Alternative Names

Ewing’s family of tumors; Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET)

Definition of Ewing’s sarcoma

Ewing’s sarcoma is a malignant (cancerous)  that affects children.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Ewing’s sarcoma can occur any time during childhood and young adulthood, but usually develops during puberty, when bones are growing rapidly. It is 10 times as common in Caucasian children as in African-American, African, and Asian children.

Symptoms

There are few symptoms. The most common is pain and occasionally swelling at the site of the tumor.

Signs and tests

If a tumor is suspected, tests to locate the primary tumor and any spread (metastasis) often include:

Treatment

Treatment should be done by a cancer specialist (oncologist) and often includes a combination of:

Expectations (prognosis)

The prognosis depends on the location of the tumor, and whether or not the cancer has spread. The best chance for cure is with a combination of treatments that includes chemotherapy plus radiation or surgery, provided at an institution that frequently treats this type of cancer.

Review

David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine; Yi-Bin Chen, MD, Leukemia/Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Massachusetts General Hospital. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc. – 3/2/2010

X-ray
Ewings sarcoma - X-ray

ADAM Medical Encyclopedia

Article written by

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability.