Dry eye syndrome

Alternative Names

Keratitis sicca; Xerophthalmia; Keratoconjunctivitis sicca

Definition of Dry eye syndrome

Dry eye syndrome is when the eye is unable to maintain a healthy layer of tears to coat it.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Dry eye syndrome often occurs in people who are otherwise healthy. It is more common with older age, because you produce fewer tears with age.

Signs and tests

Signs include:

Treatment

Treatments may include:

Expectations (prognosis)

Most patients with dry eye have only discomfort, and no vision loss. With severe cases, the clear window on the front of the eye (cornea) may become damaged or infected.

Review

Daniel E. Bustos, MD, MS, Private Practice specializing in Comprehensive Ophthalmology in Eugene, OR. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc. – 11/8/2010

Eye anatomy

ADAM Medical Encyclopedia

Article written by

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