Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)

Alternative Names

Consumption coagulopathy

Definition of Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)

Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a serious disorder in which the proteins that control blood clotting become abnormally active.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Normally, when you are injured, certain proteins in the blood become activated and travel to the injury site to help stop bleeding. However, in persons with DIC, these proteins become abnormally active. This often occurs due to inflammation, infection, or cancer.

Signs and tests

The following tests may be done:

Treatment

The goal is to determine and treat the underlying cause of DIC.

Expectations (prognosis)

The outcome depends on what is causing the disorder.

Review

David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine; Yi-Bin Chen, MD, Leukemia/Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Massachusetts General Hospital. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc. – 11/5/2009

Blood clot formation
Meningococcemia on the calves
Meningococcemia on the leg
Meningococcemia associated purpura
Blood clots

ADAM Medical Encyclopedia

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