Cranial mononeuropathy VI

Alternative Names

Abducens palsy; Lateral rectus palsy; Vith nerve palsy; Cranial nerve VI palsy

Definition of Cranial mononeuropathy VI

Cranial mononeuropathy VI is a nerve disorder. It prevents some of the muscles that control eye movements from working well. As a result, people may see two of the same image (double vision).

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Cranial mononeuropathy VI is damage to the sixth cranial (skull) nerve. This nerve, also called the abducens nerve, helps control eye movement to the left or right.

Symptoms

Symptoms may include:

Signs and tests

Tests typically show that one eye has trouble looking to the side, while the other eye moves normally. An examination shows the eyes do not line up — either at rest, or when looking in the direction of the weak eye.

Treatment

If your health care provider diagnoses swelling or inflammation of, or around the nerve, medications called corticosteroids will be used.

Expectations (prognosis)

Treating the cause may improve the condition. Most people in whom no cause is found recover completely.

Review

David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine; and Daniel B. Hoch, PhD, MD, Assistant Professor of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc. – 6/15/2010

Central nervous system

ADAM Medical Encyclopedia

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