Congenital cytomegalovirus

Alternative Names

CMV – congenital; Congenital CMV; Cytomegalovirus – congenital

Definition of Congenital cytomegalovirus

Congenital cytomegalovirus is a group of symptoms that occur when an infant is infected with the cytomegalovirus (CMV) before birth.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Congenital cytomegalovirus occurs when an infected mother passes CMV to the fetus through the placenta. The mother’s illness may not have symptoms, so she may be unaware that she has CMV.

Symptoms

Most congenitally infected children do not have symptoms. Only about 1 out of 10 infants congenitally infected with CMV have these symptoms:

Signs and tests

During the exam, the health care provider may find:

Treatment

There is no specific treatment for congenital CMV. Treatments, such as physical therapy and appropriate education for children with psychomotor retardation, focus on specific problems.

Expectations (prognosis)

Up to 90% of infants who have symptoms of their infection at birth will have neurologic abnormalities later in life. Only about 5 – 10% of infants without symptoms will have these problems.

Review

Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc. – 5/12/2009

Congenital cytomagalovirus
Antibodies

ADAM Medical Encyclopedia

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