Congenital cataract

Alternative Names

Cataract – congenital

Definition of Congenital cataract

A congenital cataract is clouding of the lens of the eye, that is present at birth. The lens of the eye is normally a clear structure, which focuses light received by the eye onto the retina.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

The number of people born with cataracts is low. In most patients, no specific cause can be found. Possible causes of congenital cataracts include the following:

Signs and tests

A complete eye examination by an ophthalmologist will readily diagnose congenital cataract. The search for a possible cause may require examination by a pediatrician experienced in hereditary disorders and possible blood tests or .

Treatment

In some cases, congenital cataracts are mild and do not affect vision, and these cases require no treatment. Moderate to severe cataracts that affect vision will require cataract removal surgery, followed by placement of an artificial intraocular lens (IOL). Patching to force the child to use the weaker eye may be required to prevent .

Expectations (prognosis)

Cataract removal surgery with placement of an artificial intraocular lens (IOL) is routine, and usually has excellent results.

Review

Paul B. Griggs, MD, Department of Ophthalmology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc. – 8/6/2009

Eye
Cataract - close-up of the eye
Rubella Syndrome
Cataract

ADAM Medical Encyclopedia

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