Cherry angioma

Alternative Names

Angioma – cherry; Senile angioma

Definition of Cherry angioma

A cherry angioma is a noncancerous (benign) skin growth.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Cherry angiomas fairly common skin growths that vary in size. They can occur almost anywhere on the body but usually develop on the trunk.

Symptoms

Skin lesion or growth:

Signs and tests

Your health care provider will probably diagnose a cherry angioma based on the appearance of the growth. No further tests are usually necessary, though a may be used to confirm the diagnosis.

Treatment

Cherry angiomas generally do not need to be treated. If they are cosmetically unattractive or they bleed often, angiomas may be removed by:

Expectations (prognosis)

Cherry angiomas are noncancerous and generally harmless. Removal usually does not cause scarring.

Review

Kevin Berman, MD, PhD, Atlanta Center for Dermatologic Disease, Atlanta, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc. – 10/3/2008

Skin layers

ADAM Medical Encyclopedia

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