Burkitt lymphoma

Alternative Names

B-cell lymphoma; High-grade B-cell lymphoma

Definition of Burkitt lymphoma

Burkitt lymphoma is a very fast growing form of .

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Burkitt lymphoma was first discovered in children in certain parts of Africa, but it also occurs in the United States.

Symptoms

Burkitt lymphoma may first be noticed as a swelling of the lymph nodes (glands) in the neck, groin, or under the arm. These swollen lymph nodes are often painless, but can grow very rapidly.

Treatment

Chemotherapy is used to treat this type of cancer. Commonly used medicines include prednisone, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, vincristine, cytarabine, doxorubicin, methotrexate, and etoposide.

Expectations (prognosis)

More than half of those with Burkitt lymphoma can be cured with intensive chemotherapy. The cure rate may be lower if the cancer spreads to the bone marrow or spinal fluid.

Review

David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine; and James R. Mason, MD, Oncologist, Director, Blood and Marrow Transplantation Program and Stem Cell Processing Lab, Scripps Clinic, Torrey Pines, California. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc. – 9/6/2010

Lymphatic system
Lymphoma, malignant - CT scan

ADAM Medical Encyclopedia

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