Basal ganglia dysfunction

Alternative Names

Extra-pyramidal syndrome

Definition of Basal ganglia dysfunction

Basal ganglia dysfunction is a problem with the basal ganglia, the deep brain structures that help start and control movement.

Symptoms

Damage to the basal ganglia cells may cause problems with one’s ability to control speech, movement, and posture. A person with basal ganglia dysfunction may have difficulty starting, stopping, or sustaining movement. Depending on which area is affected, there may also be problems with memory and other thought processes.

Signs and tests

The health care provider will perform a complete physical and neurological exam. Depending on the results, blood tests and imaging studies of the brain may be needed. This may include:

Treatment

Treatment depends on the cause of the disorder.

Expectations (prognosis)

How well a person does depends on the cause of the dysfunction. Some causes are reversible, while others require lifelong treatment.

Review

David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine; Daniel B. Hoch, PhD, MD, Assistant Professor of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc. – 9/26/2010

ADAM Medical Encyclopedia

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